CBF1000

Bikers Chat => On Two Wheels => Topic started by: Beans on 05 June, 2018, 10:21:18 PM

Title: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 05 June, 2018, 10:21:18 PM
Hi. Anticipating getting my first big bike, a cbf1000. Currently I have a 125. My house has a short narrow driveway in front that's on an incline.  This drive continues along the side of the house. Then the front of the garage is just behind the rear of the house. At the moment I tend to ride across the pavement, up the drive, alongside the house and into the garage if this is all coordinated with someone opening the garage door.
When I come out I push the bike backwards to the side of the house, then push it back and to to do a confined 10 point turn leaving it pointing out ready to ride down the drive and off. When I get the biffer I'm not sure this is going to be feasible especially the getting out routine.
Any suggestions wise ones? Remember that the drive goes uphill to the house

Thanks
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Admin on 05 June, 2018, 10:41:02 PM
What about one of the those motorcycle turntables ? I've seen them on ebay, can't remember how much they they were off my head.

All depends though on whether you've got the space width ways to turn it 180 degrees ?
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Silverdart on 05 June, 2018, 11:37:36 PM
The fact that the drive goes uphill to the house pretty much answers your question, I think.

My previous house had a similar drive. The slope wasn't terribly steep, but backing it up was something less than comfortable while astride the bike, and I felt it was too easy for the bike to tip over if I got out of the saddle and pushed it up the hill.

Ya, it might be a pain doing that 10-point turn, but I think that's preferable to either risk dropping the bike or struggling mightily up a hill.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Ali-bear on 06 June, 2018, 08:49:54 AM
I think you answered your question in the thread title: Ride in, reverse out.
This is what I do - my drive is on the flat but I have to get past the better half's TT. Needless to say I am careful when paddling it out. The low seat height makes it fairly easy to move providing you are astride it and ready on the front brake.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: oldtimer03 on 06 June, 2018, 08:53:19 AM
My driveway also slopes up to the garage, so I can just drive straight up and into the garage. Going out, I simply sit astride the bike (never just stand at the side holding the bars), and using the brake to control it, carefully allow gravity to roll it backwards onto the road; no problems. I really wouldn't worry about it; it's really not difficult when you sit on it, as the biffer's weight does seem reasonably low down. Try it.......
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Rev Ken on 06 June, 2018, 05:35:50 PM
Yup - ride up hill, then carefully reverse, preferably sitting on your bike, downhill. 10 point turns sound a bit 'iffy' as I guess it would be exhausing if sitting on the bike, and dodgy if doing it off the bike.

The same goes when parking your bike on an incline. Wherever possible ride up the gradient and then let it roll down the gradient to get out of - say - a parking bay. There is an added advantage that your side stand isn't in danger of folding in if parking on a steepish incline!
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Ianrobbo1 on 06 June, 2018, 06:26:49 PM
Reading some of these reply's makes me thankful my drive and garage are on the flat,shoving the biffer about is easy, compared to the bird, as the weight is so much lower down on the biffer, although both bikes are similar weights.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: phild on 06 June, 2018, 09:18:48 PM
If you do a ten point turn with your 125, I dread to think how many it would take with a larger bike.  :002:
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 06 June, 2018, 09:31:26 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. Ride it in forward, paddle it out backwards it will be.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: davidjg on 06 June, 2018, 10:06:21 PM
Hi. I have the same problem, the drive to my garage is about 12ft long with a gradient of about 30 degrees. Purchased one of these turntables
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Centre-Stand-Turntable-50cm-20-inch-Bike-Motorbike-Motorcycle-by-EasyTurn/292472058147?hash=item4418b17123:g:pA8AAOSwVupTpBRE
about 5 years ago and it is one of the best things I have bought. All I do now is ride the bike into the garage, put the side stand down, position the turntable underneath it, put the bike on the centre stand, push the back of the bike down slightly and turn it around so it faces the garage doors. The turntable is so well made and strong that I think it will last my lifetime. I got the large version but think the smaller version would have been better for the CBF plus cheaper.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 07 June, 2018, 07:07:44 PM
Great stuff thanks for the link to the turntable 👍
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Biker Mike on 15 June, 2018, 07:47:03 AM
or one of these:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Motorbike-Bike-Garage-Dolly-Biketek-Deluxe-Motorcycle-Centre-Stand-Mover/401539048770?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20150313114020%26meid%3D5e3f7e2033744902baf2c081b31c3588%26pid%3D100338%26rk%3D10%26rkt%3D30%26sd%3D371448890580%26itm%3D401539048770&_trksid=p2141725.c100338.m3726
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 15 June, 2018, 08:23:04 AM
Turntable should be delivered today so will update this thread with my verdict.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Biker Mike on 15 June, 2018, 08:24:09 AM
*Originally Posted by Beans [+]
Turntable should be delivered today so will update this thread with my verdict.
We'll want to see a video of it on YouTube
 :018:
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 21 June, 2018, 08:58:40 PM
Well, my verdict isn't good I'm afraid. The height of the turntable means that the centre stand operation is affected. Whilst its not thick by any means, the angle of the stand at the point where you are pushing down on it changes. This makes putting it on the stand virtually impossible. The only thing I can think of is to have the turntable sunk in the driveway so it is flush with the drive.

If none of this makes sense then I will draw a diagram ☺
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: hondacbf on 21 June, 2018, 09:36:14 PM
If you get 2 pieces of ply or similar about 300x300 mm
square and the thickness of the depth of the turntable,
Then position these so you can push the bikes wheels onto them, then position the turntable under the centre stand, then you should be able to hoist the bike onto its centre stand as normal.  Otherwise sink it in the concrete.
I only use my centre stand when parking up in the garage and use the above method (no turntable though) using a couple of pieces of ply 15mm thick and it makes putting the bike on the centre stand easy with a lot less effort.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: davidjg on 22 June, 2018, 01:56:55 PM
Sorry to learn that you are disappointed with the turntable, especially as I posted how good it is. I have now used it on 2 bikes (my last BMW) and my present CBF1000FAC GT, and also use it on my friendsí bikes without any problems when they visit. I admit it takes a slight more effort to get the bike lifted onto the turntable than without the turntable, but bear in mind that I am a 63-year-old weakling who has had 47 years practice of putting bikes on centre stands.. Have never even considered or checked the angle of centre stand feet to the turntable, as I have never had any problem with it. If you lived closer to East London, I would ride up to you help you.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Ali-bear on 22 June, 2018, 02:34:42 PM
CBF is not the easiest to get up on centre stand. Could do with a grab point on the frame LHS.
Watch out the turntable doesn't shift or rotate during the operation. Nothing worse than some unexpected movement when you are trying to get it up  :002:
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 22 June, 2018, 03:17:33 PM
The turntable itself is very well made and on the single occasion I was able to use it as intended I was indeed delighted. Centre stands are new to me so I don't have more than two weeks experience in total. I can usually get the biffer on the centre stand in favourable conditions, and hard work! but only once with the turntable beneath. I'm no physicist but the difference I suspect is that I have different angles with my levers, relatively small but significant. Especially seeing the bike in general maybe isn't the easiest to do?
Certainly don't apologise.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: davidjg on 22 June, 2018, 03:35:11 PM
hi. Practise will make it easier and make you more confident. Put it on the centre stand whenever you can. The CBF is not the easiest of bikes to put on the centre stand, but when you master it you will not have a problem doing the same with most other bikes. Good luck..
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Rev Ken on 22 June, 2018, 07:31:52 PM
*Originally Posted by Beans [+]
The turntable itself is very well made and on the single occasion I was able to use it as intended I was indeed delighted. Centre stands are new to me so I don't have more than two weeks experience in total. I can usually get the biffer on the centre stand in favourable conditions, and hard work! but only once with the turntable beneath. I'm no physicist but the difference I suspect is that I have different angles with my levers, relatively small but significant. Especially seeing the bike in general maybe isn't the easiest to do?
Certainly don't apologise.

I agree with you, the ride height is critical making it very hard to get on the centre stand with even a small decrease in ride height. I just rolled my CBF's rear wheel on to a bit of old chipboard about 3/4" thick and then it was easy. Without it I couldn't get it on the centre stand - neither could some of my friends who endeavoured to 'show me how to do it'....... :007: There is a knack, but that only works when the ride height allows it.

Edit.... Have you thought of just putting your side stand down and swiveling your bike around on that? The side stand will take it. I've only done it when really stuck but it worked for me.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 22 June, 2018, 10:36:29 PM
I cringe, rev ken, when its on the side stand. It seems like an awful lot of bike propped up by one bit of steel. I certainly couldn't bring myself to be swinging the bike around on it.  :005:
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Ianrobbo1 on 23 June, 2018, 06:07:14 AM
*Originally Posted by Beans [+]
I cringe, rev ken, when its on the side stand. It seems like an awful lot of bike propped up by one bit of steel. I certainly couldn't bring myself to be swinging the bike around on it.  :005:

I do this a fair bit with the bird and biffer, it comes to no harm,they strap bikes down on ferries using the side stand, occasionally messing up :164:
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: pedro on 23 June, 2018, 08:45:07 PM
The side stand swivel works pretty well. The trick is confidence and a bit of practice. Don't try to do a full 180 degrees in one go. Just turn it as far as you are comfortable and then put it down and reposition yourself, then repeat until the beast is pointing where you want.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Stearn on 24 June, 2018, 09:53:15 PM
I work at a bike shop and couldn't agree more. The side stand swivel is a really useful way of moving bikes around that I, and many of my colleagues, use frequently, and daily, to great effect.

I ride a biffer and it is, without doubt, one of the best balanced and easiest bikes there is to do this with, so should be great to learn with.

So here's the skinny, as they say.

Stand in the middle of the bike, with the bike on it's side stand, as if you were about to get on. Pull the left handle bar with your left hand to the stop, put your right hand on the far right of the grab (kind of diagonally opposite your left). Pull the left and right hand toward you such that you lift the bike onto the side stand. Now use your left to guide the bike round as you continue to balance the bike, with your right hand, on it's side stand. Be brave, you wont drop it.

It takes some practise, like anything, but can be mastered relatively quickly, and is really useful - good luck. Next time, if enough ask, how to actually get your knee down.
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Beans on 26 June, 2018, 06:42:00 PM
I would love to know how to get my knee down @stearn.

Anyhow swiveling on the side stand can wait, these guys on here are right. A piece of board under the back tyre, bike on side stand, turntable under, bike easily up on centre stand, turn bike, rock off ready for the next day pointing in the right direction.

Sorted
Title: Re: Ride in, reverse out?
Post by: Stearn on 26 June, 2018, 09:23:45 PM
Just to be clear doing the side stand swivel thingy does no damage to the bike. Some of the bikes we use in the training school/shop, that I work at, have had this happen to them hundreds of times!

To get your knee down - I can help with this but it is quite complex. You'll need good quality tyres, sorry about the lengthy answer.

First, stand on the right foot peg such that your right foot big toe and next toe are 'holding' the foot pegs the rest of you foot being off the foot peg. On the other side your left foot should be against the frame whilst you stand on tip toes on both sides. This will give you extra distance you'll need.

Next you'll need a constant radius, right hand, corner without traffic, like a roundabout. Go round and round this right hand constant radius in second gear. Hang off the bike with your bottom half stuck out such that your left buttock is the only part of your bottom on the seat whilst your right knee is pushed outwards. Your top half should then go back across the front of your bike such that your head is as close to being over the front forks as you can, this helps you get the bike over further.

Now increase the bikes speed, provided I have explained this properly this should produce a knee down.

If not then the other option is one - to - one lessons. As I am a qualified instructor so this could be arranged if required.

Hope this helps......