CBF1000

CBF1000 => General Maintenance, Servicing, and Mechanical => Topic started by: bross on 18 April, 2011, 12:41:46 AM

Title: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 18 April, 2011, 12:41:46 AM
I followed Fred's (FireBladerDk) excellent write-up
http://www.fireblader.dk/i_files/mc011.htm (http://www.fireblader.dk/i_files/mc011.htm)

to check the valve clearances on my 2008 CBF1000 at 25,000kms and found 4 of the valves out of spec, on the tight side. All out of spec valves were on cylinder #4. You can see the measurements in my other thread.
https://www.cbf1000.com/index.php/topic,10605.msg137036#msg137036 (https://www.cbf1000.com/index.php/topic,10605.msg137036#msg137036)

Please have the service manual to refer to as this is just my photo record and shouldn't be trusted as how to do it. Basically, you break it, you bought it and all those other disclaimers.

You'll see a link below all the pics, this will open the original large photo if you want to see more detail.

First step is to align the cams so the index mark is at the 6 o'clock position and the cams are aligned with "IN" and "EX" aligned with the head.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3412/1253025610_7bLfjZf-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3412/1253025610_7bLfjZf-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3412/1253025610_7bLfjZf-O.jpg)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3413/1253026007_9p92nzL-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3413/1253026007_9p92nzL-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3413/1253026007_9p92nzL-O.jpg)

remove the 2 cam chain guide bolts (9 lbs-ft torque when installing and use locktite)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/i-MqMdFj5/0/M/img_3406-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/i-MqMdFj5/0/M/img_3406-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/i-MqMdFj5/0/M/img_3406-O.jpg)

then tie up the cam chain so it doesn't fall into the motor.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3441/1255046536_RQXGfcW-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3441/1255046536_RQXGfcW-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3441/1255046536_RQXGfcW-O.jpg)

Next remove the cam chain tensioner. Do not bother buying the Honda tool (07ZMG-MCAA400) as it does not fit the CBF tensioner. It is too long to engage or lock the tensioner in the retracted position. You can simply remove the 2 tensioner bolts and remove the tensioner from the engine. Installation is simply using a thin flat blade screwdriver to wind and hold the tensioner in the retracted position while you insert and snug the 2 bolts.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3423/1255042797_XBsj92B-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3423/1255042797_XBsj92B-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3423/1255042797_XBsj92B-O.jpg)

There are 3 camshaft holders that need to be unbolted, a Left (Camshaft Holder B), Right (Camshaft Holder A) and a narrow holder called "Camshaft Holder C". The bolts should be loosened in a crisscross pattern a little at a time to avoid cracking or damaging the holder. The holders are labelled with an "L" for left, "R" for right so you can't mix them up. The holders also have all the bolt holes numbered in the proper tightening sequence. There are 3 different bolts used; long, short, and those with a sealing washer. Basically the inner bolts on the left and right holder use a sealing washer, while the exhaust side use the long bolts and the intake side use the short bolts.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/Screen-shot-2011-04-17-at/1255060381_WhDwc3R-S.png)

inside bolts with sealing washers
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3427/1255042838_n6WGw9n-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3427/1255042838_n6WGw9n-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3427/1255042838_n6WGw9n-O.jpg)

be very careful removing the bolts with the sealing washers, I dropped one into the motor and because they're copper you can't retrieve with a magnetic tool. I used a dab of 'Goop" on the end of the magnetic tool to fish out the washer. You've been warned.

Exhaust, Intake and inside bolts
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3461/1255049576_Jww4ctK-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3461/1255049576_Jww4ctK-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3461/1255049576_Jww4ctK-O.jpg)

bolt tightening sequence numbers, you can also see the "L" and "R" markings
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3445/1255046987_FBT3bTn-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3445/1255046987_FBT3bTn-L.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3445/1255046987_FBT3bTn-L.jpg)

check the condition and make sure the o-rings are seated in the camshaft holders, look for any scoring where the cams ride
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3437/1255044940_TDCnRdN-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3437/1255044940_TDCnRdN-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3437/1255044940_TDCnRdN-O.jpg)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3438/1255045588_2bngk98-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3438/1255045588_2bngk98-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3438/1255045588_2bngk98-O.jpg)

The camshaft holders were on snugly and I couldn't move them by hand, I ended up using a screw driver, very gingerly to pry slightly up on the holders. What you don't see in the pictures is a folded rag I had between the screwdriver and the head so I didn't damage the gasket sealing surface. It didn't take much to loosen the holders.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3436/1255045304_pnNQb4t-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3436/1255045304_pnNQb4t-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3436/1255045304_pnNQb4t-O.jpg)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3435/1255044882_xvqtThz-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3435/1255044882_xvqtThz-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3435/1255044882_xvqtThz-O.jpg)

ready to pull the cams
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3440/1255046119_M5jFdQt-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3440/1255046119_M5jFdQt-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3440/1255046119_M5jFdQt-O.jpg)

sorry for the blurry pic, but you may have to tilt the intake cam slightly to remove the cam chain. Lift the cam from the left side and you can then slide the cam chain off
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3444/1255046226_Pgg86X9-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3444/1255046226_Pgg86X9-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3444/1255046226_Pgg86X9-O.jpg)

intake cam out and showing the buckets and the magnetic tool I used to pull the bucket out of the head
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3448/1255047017_RSqVPXJ-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3448/1255047017_RSqVPXJ-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3448/1255047017_RSqVPXJ-O.jpg)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3449/1255047537_mpKNGth-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3449/1255047537_mpKNGth-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3449/1255047537_mpKNGth-O.jpg)

bucket and shim
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3450/1255047587_sj8wJMb-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3450/1255047587_sj8wJMb-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3450/1255047587_sj8wJMb-O.jpg)

another magnetic tool to retrieve the shim from the bucket
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3453/1255048340_bswnmgD-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3453/1255048340_bswnmgD-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3453/1255048340_bswnmgD-O.jpg)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3455/1255048804_CZNQtJg-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3455/1255048804_CZNQtJg-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3455/1255048804_CZNQtJg-O.jpg)

magnetic tools used
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3454/1255048204_rBxm4jX-L.jpg)

shim removed
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3452/1255047995_4GDKFRG-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3452/1255047995_4GDKFRG-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3452/1255047995_4GDKFRG-O.jpg)

new shim installed
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3460/1255049432_GnRL9Vs-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3460/1255049432_GnRL9Vs-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3460/1255049432_GnRL9Vs-O.jpg)

measuring the original shim
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3456/1255048722_8hZzZG8-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3456/1255048722_8hZzZG8-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3456/1255048722_8hZzZG8-O.jpg)

both cams out
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3465/1255050319_57RD5Vp-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3465/1255050319_57RD5Vp-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3465/1255050319_57RD5Vp-O.jpg)

cams are labeled so you can't mix them up
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3466/1255050401_tWRxs5c-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3466/1255050401_tWRxs5c-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3466/1255050401_tWRxs5c-O.jpg)

buckets galore
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3463/1255050421_3fgsdJS-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3463/1255050421_3fgsdJS-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3463/1255050421_3fgsdJS-O.jpg)

use the following formula to calculate the new shim thickness
A = (B - C) + D
A: new shim thickness
B: recorded valve clearance
C: specified valve clearance
D: old shim thickness

once you have replaced all the out of spec shims it's time to re-install the cams. Just reverse the process of taking the cams out but make sure you align the "IN" and "EX" marks with the edge of the head again. This ensures the timing is correct. I installed the exhaust cam first and it was easy to align the "EX" mark as I had lots of play in the cam chain but it took a few tries to juggle with the chain and rotate the Intake cam until I had the "IN" mark lined up properly.

Install the camshaft holders and finger tighten all the bolts, then start slowly tightening the bolts in the numbered sequence a little at a time until you have torqued them all to the required 9 lb-ft. My lb-ft torque wrench is not accurate at that little torque so I used my lb-in small wrench instead and torqued to 108 lb-in.

Install the cam chain tensioner. I used a thin flat blade screw driver to wind the tensioner clockwise to retract the tensioner, then holding the tensioner body and the screwdriver to keep it retracted re-install the tensioner into the engine and get the bolts finger tight before letting go of the screwdriver. Now tighten the bolts on the tensioner.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3467/1255050872_6Jv3JZd-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3467/1255050872_6Jv3JZd-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3467/1255050872_6Jv3JZd-O.jpg)

(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3468/1255051093_BsxjzPr-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3468/1255051093_BsxjzPr-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3468/1255051093_BsxjzPr-O.jpg)

(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3469/1255051442_G5cRB6T-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3469/1255051442_G5cRB6T-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3469/1255051442_G5cRB6T-O.jpg)
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3470/1255051804_w23QMF7-L.jpg)
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3470/1255051804_w23QMF7-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3470/1255051804_w23QMF7-O.jpg)

Recheck your valve clearances before installing the cam cover.

One trick I learned working on my BMW boxer to make sure you don't get weeping from a cam cover was to make sure the cam cover gasket is completely free of oil before re-installing.
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3471/1255051878_wSRrv63-L.jpg)

One old spark plug and a new Iridium ready to go in. I just wanted regular plugs but the Iridiums ended up being cheaper, so the CBF gets the good plugs this time.  :002:
(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3472/1255052024_n9zL2nz-L.jpg)

At this point I'll point you back to Fred's articles on buttoning the top end back up. Install your new spark plugs and fresh anti freeze and your bikes good for another 24k.
http://www.fireblader.dk/i_files/mc016.htm#installation_procedure (http://www.fireblader.dk/i_files/mc016.htm#installation_procedure)
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: FireBladerDk on 18 April, 2011, 07:14:57 AM
Hi bross,

fantastic nice work you have done - and with lots of detailed pics.
 :046:

Here are -> 2 POINTS  <- for the teaser in the other thread and another -> 10 POINTS  <- for this DIY contribution!

Having already received your authorization via PM, I will asap add your work to our CBF1000 on-line service manual on www.fireblader.dk

 :031: ... Fred
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Snibor on 18 April, 2011, 08:17:37 AM
Hi bross, a very interesting article and a job well done, great stuff. I wonder what Mr Honda would charge for such a job?? - Snibor
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: RogerG on 18 April, 2011, 08:45:22 AM
Hi bross, very impressive  :460:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Bifferman on 18 April, 2011, 12:57:51 PM
Bross, I doff my cap to you :123:

You can have as many official service, Claymer or Haynes manuals as you like but there is NOTHING to beat the experience of someone who has actually done the job.

Thanks for taking the time to share.  This thread is now included in my tech favourites folder.

Andy

 :149:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Danish on 18 April, 2011, 01:01:51 PM
Nice job, Brent, and a lot more details than the manual. I guess you got the timing right. I did the camchain on my cbx750, but it is a little different. The tensioner also was removed like you did, and I had the cams out.

Cheers,
Peter
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 18 April, 2011, 03:07:25 PM
*Originally Posted by Snibor [+]
Hi bross, a very interesting article and a job well done, great stuff. I wonder what Mr Honda would charge for such a job?? - Snibor
When I couldn't get the cam chain tensioner to work I was getting pretty discouraged and was thinking about rolling the bike onto the trailer and hauling it to my dealer. I called and explained the situation, that I had the bike stripped to the cam covers, how much would it cost to simply swap the out of spec shims? He said the valve job on the CBF was listed as 5 hours and he talked to his mechanic who figured getting the bike in the state it was in would have saved him about an hour so I was quoted $340.

My dealer is over an hour away so it's not so much about the money but convenience or lack of it, and why I try to do all the work on the bikes.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: RadMan on 18 April, 2011, 03:29:23 PM
Bravo, great job and thank you for posting!
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: arizonarocket on 18 April, 2011, 05:29:52 PM
Nice work Bross!

I'll give this DIY a try next time.

Cheers,

AR  :031:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 20 April, 2011, 05:06:41 AM
Forgot to mention this ground connection. Quite a few people on the VFR forum have been finding bad/poor/corroded ground connections.

(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3431/1255044123_M6WCSSh-L-1.jpg)

Anyway, before you throw your tank back on, check this connection. I removed it, cleaned the frame with a wire brush and applied dialectric grease to all the ground connections and bolt before re-tightening.

Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: FireBladerDk on 20 April, 2011, 12:31:41 PM
*Originally Posted by bross [+]
... some speculate this could be causing some of the their stator failures, which I guess may make sense. If the stator can't dump excess current to ground then it could cause it to over heat. ...

The stator is "floating" and must definitely not have any connection to ground. So I would not consider this a source for stator failures. Apart from that keeping the grounding point in perfect condition is always important.

 :002: ... Fred
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 20 April, 2011, 05:01:34 PM
Good to know, thanks Fred. Mine's clean now.  :031:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: TerryR on 21 April, 2011, 07:14:46 AM
*Originally Posted by FireBladerDk [+]
The stator is "floating" and must definitely not have any connection to ground. So I would not consider this a source for stator failures.

A bad ground could confuse the regulator which, in turn, could damage the alternator. I don't think it's likely but I wouldn't say it's impossible.

T.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: java on 22 April, 2011, 01:57:55 AM
Great posting and job well done Bross! I definitive will bookmark your posting for future reference.

 :190:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 22 April, 2011, 04:13:42 PM
Updated my message Fred to remove the confusing/wrong statements and left it at simply, clean the connection. That will keep confusion to a minimum in the future.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: FireBladerDk on 25 April, 2011, 12:26:36 PM
Hi All,

I have now integrated the excellent "Valve Clearance Adjustment DIY" description by bross with our on-line manual on www.fireblader.dk .

First of all thanks to bross for his contibution.  :047: I know only too well  how much work and time is takes to document the work with so many pictures and text.

Secondly I would - as always - appreciate input from reviewers so we can be sure nothing is left in the dark in the <a href="http://www.fireblader.dk/i_files/valvejob/valvejob.htm">Valve Clearance Adjustment DIY Article</a>.

I will open the review with a couple of questions you bross:

1) You did not describe anything about the cam chain guide at the top (ref. page 9-9 in the Honda Shop Manual). I suppose it was just as described in the shop manual and I just need to add a sentence about this. Did you take any pictures showing this item?

2) Do I need to add anything more to the tools list?

 :031: ... Fred

 
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: eskandalis on 25 April, 2011, 10:00:31 PM
You just tuned the hole bike not just the valves.
great job !!!
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Bifferman on 26 April, 2011, 09:00:06 AM
*Originally Posted by bross [+]
Forgot to mention this ground connection. Quite a few people on the VFR forum have been finding bad/poor/corroded ground connections.

(http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/IMG3431/1255044123_M6WCSSh-L-1.jpg)

Anyway, before you throw your tank back on, check this connection. I removed it, cleaned the frame with a wire brush and applied dialectric grease to all the ground connections and bolt before re-tightening.

I am  :087:  Why use a dialetric grease on an ground point.  Dialectric grease is a silicon based NON conductive grease and if you have removed the wires and plastered this all over your ground point before reinstating the wires that need grounding then you will reduce the grounding effect rather than enhance it.

The first time I had the tank up I noticed a bit of electric corrosion around the  terminals.  Removed, cleaned, replaced and then applied Finnigans Waxoyl.  Keep the connections free from anything that might insulate the connection, then add the anti corrosion treatment whether ordinary grease, Waxoyl or even Dialectric but do NOT smother the terminals with Dialectric grease as you reassemble - leave CLEAN and protect after all bolted back together.

Andy

 :149:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 26 April, 2011, 10:27:53 AM
Why do a lot of wiring harnesses come from the factory filled with this grease? And it's been regularly recommended on the Triumph forums that the first thing you do to a modern Triumph twin (Bonneville, Scrambler) is to remove *every* connector, including the spark plug caps and apply dialectric grease liberally, basically fill each connector with grease, then re-connect. My own Scrambler died twice while riding in the rain, until I did the above. Then I never had another problem riding in the rain???

Any article I have ever read about using dialectric grease recommends applying to both sides of a connection before reconnecting???
http://www.ehow.com/how_5621534_apply-dielectric-grease.html (http://www.ehow.com/how_5621534_apply-dielectric-grease.html)

"Open the tube of dielectric grease and apply a small amount to the surfaces of the connectors where they meet. The grease will help stop future corrosion while allowing the electricity to make contact through it.

Reassemble the connector or plug in the bulb carefully. If any grease squeezes out during reassembly, wipe it off with a rag or towel."


and another that agrees with you in saying it's non-conductive, but also recommends applying to contact surfaces.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dielectric-grease.htm (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dielectric-grease.htm)

"While the indicated use of dielectric grease calls for it to be used only on the non-metal parts of a connection, it has been shown to be effective at preventing corrosion when applied directly to the metal connectors as well. Care should be taken when using it in this way, because this application can, in some instances, cause the connection to stop working. A common reason for such a failure is that the grease has not been pushed entirely out of the way between the two points of contact."

I'm a believer after experiencing the intermittent stalling problems on my Scrambler and having them completely go away after using the dialectric grease on all the connectors.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Danish on 26 April, 2011, 04:02:07 PM
I havenīt used this grease, but it is probably working by sealing out moisture from the connection so there can be no corrosion.

The groundconnection can be tested to see if there is a voltdrop indicating resistance. The volts on the connectors should be the same as the volts on the frame after the groundpoint.

Cheers
Peter
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 27 April, 2011, 06:34:21 PM
*Originally Posted by FireBladerDk [+]
Hi All,

I have now integrated the excellent "Valve Clearance Adjustment DIY" description by bross with our on-line manual on www.fireblader.dk .

First of all thanks to bross for his contibution.  :047: I know only too well  how much work and time is takes to document the work with so many pictures and text.

Secondly I would - as always - appreciate input from reviewers so we can be sure nothing is left in the dark in the <a href="http://www.fireblader.dk/i_files/valvejob/valvejob.htm">Valve Clearance Adjustment DIY Article</a>.

I will open the review with a couple of questions you bross:

1) You did not describe anything about the cam chain guide at the top (ref. page 9-9 in the Honda Shop Manual). I suppose it was just as described in the shop manual and I just need to add a sentence about this. Did you take any pictures showing this item?

2) Do I need to add anything more to the tools list?

 :031: ... Fred
Added a photo for the cam chain guide Fred and the torque of 9 lbs-ft when re-installing. Link to the original photo for you...
http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/i-MqMdFj5/0/M/img_3406-O.jpg (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/i-MqMdFj5/0/M/img_3406-O.jpg)

Sorry I've been swamped here but will try to go through the tools list for you. Thanks for adding this to your DIY.  :031:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: FireBladerDk on 27 April, 2011, 10:17:04 PM
Hi bross,

thanks for the new picture. I have already added it to the DIY with some extra text.

The link you presented was to a 338 x 450 pixel image of 75KB, so it is unfortunately not the original high-resolution image.

I also added a little extra text about the assemply procedure.

 :031: ... Fred
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: bross on 27 April, 2011, 10:46:35 PM
Sorry Fred, try this one.

http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/5494854_uiDUN#1267913451_MqMdFj5-O-LB (http://faithcottage.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/CBF1000/5494854_uiDUN#1267913451_MqMdFj5-O-LB)
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: FireBladerDk on 28 April, 2011, 06:51:44 PM
Thanks bross -  :002:
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: McNabb on 28 April, 2011, 08:43:26 PM
I believe the reason the dialectric grease works and is sometimese recommended is that it basically gets pushed out of the way where any contact is made.  But, the rest is sticking around to protect the connector itself.  Globbed on and not tightened I can see this causing major problems.   Putting some on and tightening things down should push enough of the stuff out of the way that it is not going to impede the connection, but still keep the water and corresion out.  I know I do see this stuff on electrical connectors on my car, I believe that it is mainly to protect the non-metalic parts like rubber boots etc.  For example, there is a product specifically for spark plugs and spark plug boots made of this stuff, so there has to be a use for it in electrical connections of some kind.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: melb_rider on 29 April, 2011, 05:12:14 AM
Would a conductive grease, like the carbon grease you put on switches, be a better choice maybe? Should be just as good at keeping moisture out, and will maintain the connection...
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Stvlas on 27 October, 2020, 04:17:54 PM
Hi There,
Followed your very good and detailed tutorial. Gave me the courage to do it. Results in pics below. Will reassemble next week when I get the new shim sizes.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Art on 28 October, 2020, 07:56:15 AM
Well done and how refreshing to see the numbers, bench mark set! Was that the first valve clearance inspection?

I'll be getting down and dirty with my valve clearances about this time next year.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Stvlas on 28 October, 2020, 08:28:06 AM
Hi Art,
Sure is the first. Scares me a bit, but I suppose patience & time solves most things at my age (58yrs) 😯. Says in the manual that plug-hole gaskets must be replaced? Did you do this?
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Art on 28 October, 2020, 09:03:59 AM
Plug-hole gaskets, do you mean the spark plug crush washers? I've never replaced spark plug crush washers but while you're there you should be replacing the spark plugs, they come with new crush washers fitted. When I've done valve inspections in the past I've always been careful with gaskets and can't ever recall the need to replace any.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Stvlas on 28 October, 2020, 09:12:09 AM
Hi Art,
What I meant to say was the plug hole O-Rings....
Mine look intact, but they feel a bit on the hard side, so I've ordered a new set. Don't want an oil leak and have to disassemble everything again 😳.....
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Art on 28 October, 2020, 10:54:08 AM
If you've ordered them you may as well fit them.
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: FireBladerDk on 30 November, 2020, 08:25:21 PM
Well done Stvlas, and nice to see such detailed example on the use of my DIY article!

 :041: ... Fred
Title: Re: Valve adjustment
Post by: Stvlas on 30 November, 2020, 09:26:45 PM
Hi Fred,
Your post was very detailed and helpful. Gave me the courage to tackle the task 👍.... First time for everything, now I have no fear of doing it in future. Bike is reassembled and going well again.
Many Thanks