29 Nov 23, 05:34 am

Recent Posts

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91
General Maintenance, Servicing, and Mechanical / Re: Seized Chain Adjuster
« Last post by Art on 31 October, 2023, 12:00:22 pm »
Never got around to that rear tyre but here's my rear wheel tool kit. Note the piece of ply and wooden chock supporting the weight of the rear wheel and the No3 cross point screwdriver to line up the rear wheel, axle and swinging arm when re-assembling.

Don't forget to coat the adjusters and axle with a general purpose lithium grease.

92
For Sale Board / Re: Various CBF Accessories for sale
« Last post by phild on 31 October, 2023, 12:00:06 pm »
All gone to the charity shop.👍
93
New Members / Re: Back on a bike
« Last post by edger on 30 October, 2023, 06:15:07 pm »
Bought a new bike in the winter respect !!! heated grips and base layer thermals rule  :001:
94
Lighting, Electrical, and Wiring / Re: spark plugs
« Last post by marky99925 on 30 October, 2023, 01:59:15 pm »
Yes Art exactly right, Nick stressed 10-12nm, and for clarity he also mentioned the half thread. I haven't checked the manual recommended torque yet but based your point about the different metal i see the justification for Nick's insistence on 10-12nm and will go with it.
As a kid i well remember stripping the thread in a suzuki 2 stroke, at least it was easily accessible, this was before  i had heard of torque wrenches, (and couldn't have afforded them anyway, happy days...well not that one!).
95
Lighting, Electrical, and Wiring / Re: spark plugs
« Last post by Art on 30 October, 2023, 01:22:19 pm »
As I read that my thought was stainless steel may be a harder material than the regular steel washer, did Nick specify what the correct torque would be? I note Honda specification for the spark plug torque is 16 Nm but NGK specification is 10-12 Nm for their M10 threaded spark plugs into an aluminium head although it aybe that the NGK lower specification does not apply to the EH half threaded plug types.
96
Lighting, Electrical, and Wiring / Re: spark plugs
« Last post by marky99925 on 30 October, 2023, 11:07:25 am »
OK mystery solved, for anyone who is interested NGK rang me from the UK today, (!) The 'S' denotes a stainless steel washer and that is the only difference, so all good to use.
Nick in technical did impress the importance of using the correct torque. What a brilliant response.
97
General Maintenance, Servicing, and Mechanical / Re: Seized Chain Adjuster
« Last post by Art on 30 October, 2023, 09:36:53 am »
Remove the axle nut, support the weight of the wheel on a piece of plywood and wooden chock or similar (photograph to follow as I'm taking my rear wheel off for a new rear tyre later today) and tap the axle with a soft polyurethane or rubber mallet to free it. To completely remove the axle you will need to rotate it (lefty loosey) as you pull it out by hand.  If you don't have a soft mallet eBay, Amazon or your preferred tool supplier should get you sorted for around 5, no need for the home mechanic to buy anything reassuringly expensive here. Attack it with a hammer monkey boy style at your own risk of damaging the threads, when re-assembling the adjusters and axle a goodly coating of a general purpose lithium grease, torque to 98 Nm (72 lbf-ft) no more no less, noting the axle nut is a re-usable U- nut with a friction clamp cut into the top threads.
98
General Maintenance, Servicing, and Mechanical / Re: Seized Chain Adjuster
« Last post by kingstonr on 30 October, 2023, 06:39:36 am »
That's Art.

No axle is seized too probably around left swing arm area.  I put some penetrating fluid on last night but aren't that confident of getting the axle moving.  Hopefully wonders do happen.

Maybe a job for local shop. I'll have another go tonight.
99
New Members / Re: Back on a bike
« Last post by Art on 30 October, 2023, 01:10:09 am »
 :405:

The CBF1000 is a much over looked choice for a Sports Tourer that ticks many boxes in its class. Mostly thanks to greedy dealerships over stocking to beat the January 2011 rise in tax rates 2012 was a transitional year for the sale of Honda CBF 1000's with two models being sold. The earlier, original model manufactured between 2006 and 2010 was sold between 2006 and 2013 and is the SC58 (MKI). The later face lift model manufactured and sold from 2010 to 2013 is the SC64 (MKII) with some new old stock being sold and registered as late as 2016. Check the 4th to 7th digits of the VIN number to be sure which model you have. While you're there check the 10th digit of the VIN number which indicates the year of assembly 6=2006, 7=2007, 8=2008, 9=2009, A=2010, B=2011, C=2012 etc.

eBay, Amazon or your preferred retailer could be your best friend, get yourself a disc lock reminder.

100
General Maintenance, Servicing, and Mechanical / Re: Seized Chain Adjuster
« Last post by Art on 30 October, 2023, 12:39:02 am »
That's virtually impossible with the amount of play there is between the adjuster the adjuster and swinging arm, have you slackened off the axle nut?

Is there any horizontal movement in the axle?
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