Author Topic: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article  (Read 7092 times)

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#10

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #10 on: 12 November, 2010, 03:10:03 PM
My CBF1000 is now inside my warm garage and ready for its second set of rear brake pads which I will install this weekend.

According to the service schedule it is also more than high time that the brake fluid is exchanged. I have never had brake fluid problems on any of my vehicles, even when postponing exchange a lot, and would like to get input from members of this superactive forum on the following:

Brakefluid must be replaced every 2 years to make sure that:

1) absorbed water does not create vapor bubbles under extreme braking.
2) brake fluid manufactures and service shops make more profit.
3) draining screws does not grow stuck if not loosened regularly.
4) other reasons?

Which statements are true and to what extent?

Correction: Statement 3 should have read:

3) draining screws do not grow stuck if loosened regularly

 :031: ... Fred

Last Edit: 12 November, 2010, 07:23:26 PM by FireBladerDk

#11

Offline alan sh

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #11 on: 12 November, 2010, 03:41:21 PM
My opinion:

All are false.

Brake (and clutch) fluid does absorb water over the years and becomes less efficient. You can easily tell because the fluid goes dark. It takes anywhere between 2 and 4 years normally for this to happen and doesn't seem to depend on mileage.

On my current FJR, I got it done at 3 years - not that I'd noticed any issues, but I just felt it was time.  My second FJR had fluid that went black in 6 months so there was something wrong somewhere. I sold it on before it became a problem to me (I did change the fluids first).

Alan
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#12

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #12 on: 12 November, 2010, 07:16:02 PM
Oh - I got my third statement wrong. It should have been:

3) draining screws do not grow stuck if loosened regularly.

And this is - in my opinion - the most valid statement, because I have struggled with draining (bleed) screws on cars which had gone so stuck, that even the most extreme methods (like welding big nuts on them) were not enough to loosen them.

But I have never experienced any troubles with old brake fluid causing vapor bubbles under even quite severe braking.
 
My key point (question) here is that if you dont drive like the Devil is catching up with you, how many years will it take for the fluid to absorb enough water to present any real safety problem?
Last Edit: 12 November, 2010, 07:19:58 PM by FireBladerDk

#13

Offline johnstg2

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #13 on: 12 November, 2010, 07:23:06 PM
Before anyone gets the wrong idea, let me stress that I am not saying "Do not bother changing your brake fluid" to anyone.

Yes brake fluid is hygroscopic, and moisture in the fluid can turn to steam (which is compressable) if the fluid is heated enough. But here is where I get sceptical. How will water get into what is a sealed system? Even the reservoir has a diaphragm on the surface of the fluid to prevent it coming into contact with air. If there are any leaks in the system, fluid will come out much quicker than air can get in. Such leaks will become apparent very quickly as the fluid level drops.

Second point, water boils at 100'C (at atmospheric pressure at sea level) as we all remember from high school. Now after a ride, place your hand on the caliper, not the disc, and tell me if you think it's hot enough to boil water. I think not. Though I've no experience of racing bikes I can imagine very high temperatures in the calipers would be a problem there.

I once had a Ford Sierra for 17 years and it still had the original brake fluid in it, and the brakes never gave me any problems. My bike is 4 years old now and I'm not about to rush out and change the fluid in that. I think the manufacturers are being way over cautious in recommending fluid changes every 2 years. This is probably because the consequences of brake failure are so huge, and they obviously want to avoid litigation,

Fluid changes are even less likely to be required in the clutch system as the fluid will never see any heat, except the warmth of the slave cylinder.

So I will repeat the message of my opening statement. If you want to change your fluids that's fine by me, I won't be telling you not to, but unless I see some compelling evidence I won't bother changing mine.
Boys never grow up - their toys just get more expensive.

#14

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #14 on: 12 November, 2010, 07:34:23 PM
Well formulated johnstg2 - I aggree, Hence untill proven wrong I still believe the corrected version of statement 3 to be the one to keep in mind:

3) draining screws do not grow stuck if loosened regularly.

Hence by bleeding out and replacing just some of the fluid every 2-4 years, you keep the bleading system in shape and the fluid will be sufficiently replaced over the years.

#15

Offline weaver

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #15 on: 13 November, 2010, 02:49:42 AM
I quite agree,
I have a 33 year BMW. and a 20 year old Honda.
and both have never had the fluid changed,
so far no problems??
Just another ploy for dealer to charge us more, :211: :oldie:

#16

Offline Charterhouse

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #16 on: 22 December, 2010, 04:33:45 PM
Great article.  If I have to service the brakes or free the pistons due to limited use or the bike being used during the winter and salty conditions I assume I can follow similar procedure though I will have to remove the caliper to gain access to pistons to apply copper greese.  Are there things I need to consider before I remove?

#17

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #17 on: 22 December, 2010, 09:52:56 PM
*Originally Posted by Charterhouse [+]
Great article.  If I have to service the brakes or free the pistons due to limited use or the bike being used during the winter and salty conditions I assume I can follow similar procedure though I will have to remove the caliper to gain access to pistons to apply copper grease.  Are there things I need to consider before I remove?

Hi Carterhouse,

over the years of servicing my own vehicles, I've learned that I save a lot of time if I invest just a little time to take a few proper precautions, which in this case are to:

- use cobber grease when assembling (not on rubber parts though)
- take our three bikes out of the garage at least once every month, starting them up and if possible taking short rides up and down our road toe exercise all the moving parts, including the brakes.

In this way I enjoy the sound of the bikes and even get a short rides instead of having to dismantle brakes grown stuck during winter hibernation.

But C. - if the pistons on your bike have gone stuck - I see the following options:

- try to exercise the pistons back and forth just as you do during the bake pad replacement procedure.
- grind the old pads down say one millimeter to get extra movement.

if the above fails, you probably should:
- replace the brake hose to be sure it is not a blockage inside this
- remove the caliper and do a real overhaul of this, or easier replace it with an overhauled caliper.

if you have replace the brake hose, you're in for a full bleed procedure upon reassembly.
I have not done this myself yet on any of my bikes, but often on cars. Just read the procedure in the Honda Shop manual.

Cheers ... Fred

#18

Offline arizonarocket

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #18 on: 23 December, 2010, 12:37:29 AM
Thanks for the great article.

The only things that I can think of adding is loosening off the exhaust to get a better view and expand the work area.  You've clearly done that in the pictures though...

I found working from the opposite side of the bike while putting the inside brake pads on helped as I could see the retaining clips.  They can be tricky when you can't see them but very simple if you can.  (This is also true for the front brakes).

Great article.  Often just reading your articles is enough to inspire people to give DIY a try ... it really isn't that hard once your into it.

 

#19

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - DIY Article
Reply #19 on: 23 December, 2010, 11:57:44 AM
*Originally Posted by arizonarocket [+]
... is loosening off the exhaust to get a better view and expand the work area.  You've clearly done that in the pictures though...
... inspire people to give DIY a try  ...

Hi A-rocket,

no I have not fiddled with the exhaust mounting while doing the rear brake pad job. I use an old side mirror from a car to get a better view.

Inspirering people to DIY and to hopefully also to write more DIY like inputs, was my original reason for writing these DIY articles. As a community we can support eachother via this.

 :031: ... Fred

 


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