Author Questions CBF1000FA  (Read 851 times)

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  • Offline NakedGunPT   pt

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    Offline NakedGunPT

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    Questions CBF1000FA
    on: 31 July, 2022, 10:03:33 pm
    31 July, 2022, 10:03:33 pm
    Hello, writing this message from Portugal!, in a few days will be seeing and hopefully buying a used 2013 Honda CBF1000FA, and tought stop by just to ask a 2nd opinion.
    The Bike in question has 63,000kms done, I dont know the history of the bike, is it safe to say that depending on treatment and abuse that the owner as done 63,000kms (39 146 miles), can I assume that thoose amount of (KMS/Miles) is it a considerable amount for engine or other components or could it be good as new?
    The onwer sent me a video of the condition of the bike and a video of the engine running and revving couldn't spot nothing of the ordinary but in a video its a bit hard.

    Also what kinda tyres you recomend for commuting on sundays, and touring, and HOT tarmac

    Last Edit: 31 July, 2022, 10:05:03 pm by NakedGunPT

  • Online Art   england

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    Online Art

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    Re: Questions CBF1000FA
    Reply #1 on: 01 August, 2022, 09:34:02 am
    01 August, 2022, 09:34:02 am
    I would never consider buying any motor vehicle without having seen it first hand in the flesh, especially if it's from a private seller. If the engine oil and filter have been changed every 12,000 Km's or annually/bi-annually the engine should be good but there's more to it than that. At 63,00Km's is over and above two major 24,000Km service intervals, were either of these carried out in accordance to the Honda service schedule?

    Documented service history is what you should be interested in ask at what date and mileage were the likes of valve clearances, spark plugs, brake fluid, clutch fluid, coolant, fork oil, air filter, engine oil and filter last tended to? Also check for corrosion, especially behind the front wheel including the radiator and forward of the rear wheel including the swinging arm and centre stand.

    Tyres - I've been happy with the Bridgestone BT-023's, excellent all year rain and shine performance including the recent +40C heat wave we've had here in the UK
    Last Edit: 01 August, 2022, 09:38:55 am by Art

  • Offline NakedGunPT   pt

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    Offline NakedGunPT

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    Re: Questions CBF1000FA
    Reply #2 on: 01 August, 2022, 09:58:04 am
    01 August, 2022, 09:58:04 am
    *Originally Posted by Art [+]
    I would never consider buying any motor vehicle without having seen it first hand in the flesh, especially if it's from a private seller. If the engine oil and filter have been changed every 12,000 Km's or annually/bi-annually the engine should be good but there's more to it than that. At 63,00Km's is over and above two major 24,000Km service intervals, were either of these carried out in accordance to the Honda service schedule?

    Documented service history is what you should be interested in ask at what date and mileage were the likes of valve clearances, spark plugs, brake fluid, clutch fluid, coolant, fork oil, air filter, engine oil and filter last tended to? Also check for corrosion, especially behind the front wheel including the radiator and forward of the rear wheel including the swinging arm and centre stand.

    Tyres - I've been happy with the Bridgestone BT-023's, excellent all year rain and shine performance including the recent +40C heat wave we've had here in the UK

    My mechanic will come with me on that though he did a regular service at 62,000kms oil, oil filter, brake fluid, nothing major only regular stuff, just wanted to ask if 63k kms on this bike was alot or not at all, but its like I tought and your reply depends on the person who treated her and the maintenance.
    Thanks!
    Last Edit: 01 August, 2022, 09:59:50 am by NakedGunPT

  • Offline NakedGunPT   pt

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    Offline NakedGunPT

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    Re: Questions CBF1000FA
    Reply #3 on: 21 August, 2022, 01:53:18 pm
    21 August, 2022, 01:53:18 pm
    Ordered some SW-Motech sliders for the bike, to install it can anyone tell me if I need to jack up my engine in order to install? I know some bikes on the side stand the pressure inst enough for the engine to drop down a few mm.

  • Online Art   england

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    Online Art

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    Re: Questions CBF1000FA
    Reply #4 on: 21 August, 2022, 04:44:23 pm
    21 August, 2022, 04:44:23 pm
    No need to support the engine, the rear mounting bolts and one front bolt are enough to support the engine, just fit one side at a time. The tricky part is removing the engine mounting bolts without shearing or stripping the lugs so soak the threads overnight in a penetrating fluid then undo the bolt slowly by hand using nothing more than a socket and tee bar or ratchet handle, do not use power tools, do not use an impact driver. After the initial crack slowly undo the bolt a quarter turn at a time, if there is any resistance turn the bolt a quarter turn each way, a quarter turn out and a quarter turn in and repeat until the threads ease, applying more penetrating fluid to lubricate and cool the threads as necessary. Patience is the key here, in extreme cases it can take 20-30 minutes of turning in and out to safely remove each bolt. The sliders come with longer replacement bolts, coat them in a light machine oil and run them in and out of the lugs three or four times to clean the lug threads, wiping any debris off the bolts as you go, wipe the surplus oil off the bolt threads before the final fit.