Author Topic: Spark plug tool  (Read 1296 times)

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#10

Offline Art

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Re: Spark plug tool
Reply #10 on: 05 March, 2022, 09:36:27 PM
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
If you need to remove the spark plugs I 'm sure this can be done with a 3/8" square drive spark plug socket, extension bar and ratchet or tee bar. I'll let you know next week when I swap out my spark plugs on an over due extended 16,000 mile service and valve clearance check.

A bit late to the party but I can now confirm CBF 1000 spark plugs can be removed using a 3/8 square drive socket set comprising 16mm (or 5/8 AF) spark plug socket, universal joint, 75mm extension bar, and ratchet handle.

#11

Offline OAPJinx

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Re: Spark plug tool
Reply #11 on: 06 March, 2022, 01:59:46 PM
Turns out spoke too soon as wont start again

#12

Offline Art

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Re: Spark plug tool
Reply #12 on: 06 March, 2022, 03:39:52 PM
When it fails to start check the level of voltage across the battery terminals to rule out the ECU cuttimg out due to low voltage.

Are there any current or stored fault codes?

Check out my how to read DTC's here

In the meantime make sure the battery is fully charged and holding 12.6v or more
Last Edit: 06 March, 2022, 03:41:10 PM by Art

#13

Offline Art

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Re: Spark plug tool
Reply #13 on: 06 March, 2022, 04:48:26 PM
*Originally Posted by OAPJinx [+]
Thanks for the advice on tool. Turns out plugs were all fouled well three were, buggered if I could get to No 3. But cleaned up and fired first time. Think may start using super from now on

If the plugs are all fouled you need to find the reason why, since it's unlikely all the plugs would fail at the same time the fault is probably elsewhere, although while you've got the plugs out best practice is to replace them with a new set of NGK CR8EH-9's.

A common cause of fouled plugs is a blocked or clogged air filter for what they cost, less than 15, you may as well replace it with a Hiflo HFA1927 air filter. Other causes of fouled plugs include valve train faults or valve clearances which can mostly be ruled out with a compression test.

Removing the spark plugs is not so difficult, problems are caused or experienced by taking short cuts, here's how I do it. Remove the seats, upper cowls and side panels to raise the tank. Now you need to remove or displace everything that's in your way so...

Disconnect and move to one side the crankcase breather hose, drain the coolant, remove the radiator top hose. Remove the cowl support frames. Remove the PAIR solenoid valve and its hoses. To disconnect the 2-pin connector from the PAIR control solenoid use a pair of long nose pliers to depress the connector tab, its far easier than trying to get your fingers in there. The solenoid valve and hoses are then removed from the left side, the valve is held in place on a rubber mount that slides off a tab.

Disconnect the ignition coil pack wiring, unbolt the ignition coil packs and feed the HT leads towards the spark plug caps to gain enough slack to raise the 150 mm plug caps out of the camshaft cover. The spark plug HT lead caps can put up a bit of a fight because they're rubber sleeved and the rubber sticks to the sides of the holes in the camshaft cover but once you've made room they are easily removed by rotating the caps left and right as you pull them straight up, once they start moving they lift out with ease.
Last Edit: 06 March, 2022, 05:05:12 PM by Art

 


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