Author Topic: Tyre levers and bead breakers  (Read 648 times)

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Offline knapdog

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Tyre levers and bead breakers
on: 06 March, 2021, 07:35:26 AM
I'm interested in removing and fitting tyres myself. I already have a balancing kit but have started looking at various levers and bead breakers.
I'd appreciate any help if you've had experience on the subject.
I'm currently looking at the following:


Seem to have excellent reviews.


I'm wondering if that dip at the top would act as a bead breaker.


Have seen one used in "Del Boy's Garage" on YouTube. Easily used though not sure how sturdy they'd be over the years.

I've also ordered rim protectors.

Any thoughts?
Last Edit: 06 March, 2021, 07:36:36 AM by knapdog
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#1

Offline Steelworker

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #1 on: 06 March, 2021, 08:58:20 AM
Hi Knapdog
I bought an "abba" tyre change kit three years ago which has the bead breaker , wheel balancer, levers , rim protectors ect.
I think they are about 180 now but you can get the bead breaker separately.
Excellent piece of kit and found changing my tyre fairly easy.  There's a utube video on using the bead breaker.
It's advisable to warm your new tyre up prior to fitting, I did mine in the summer and left it in the sun for half an hour.
I used an airline where I worked to seat the new tyre bead on the rim. You can do it with a foot pump , I've never tried but I think it would be a bit of a struggle.
To be honest, unless your changing lots of tyres it's not really cost effective to do it yourself, most places fit for free but after years of doing my own maintenance, tyre changing was the only thing I didn't do and I got a lot of satisfaction out of doing this job myself.
Hope this helps.


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Offline knapdog

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #2 on: 06 March, 2021, 09:02:25 AM
*Originally Posted by Steelworker [+]
Hi Knapdog
I bought an "abba" tyre change kit three years ago which has the bead breaker , wheel balancer, levers , rim protectors ect.
I think they are about 180 now but you can get the bead breaker separately.
Excellent piece of kit and found changing my tyre fairly easy.  There's a utube video on using the bead breaker.
It's advisable to warm your new tyre up prior to fitting, I did mine in the summer and left it in the sun for half an hour.
I used an airline where I worked to seat the new tyre bead on the rim. You can do it with a foot pump , I've never tried but I think it would be a bit of a struggle.
To be honest, unless your changing lots of tyres it's not really cost effective to do it yourself, most places fit for free but after years of doing my own maintenance, tyre changing was the only thing I didn't do and I got a lot of satisfaction out of doing this job myself.
Hope this helps.

Thank you.
Unfortunately, in this part of the world, if you take your tyre/wheel to be fitted, the charge is never less than 10 per wheel, in my experience.
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Offline knapdog

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #3 on: 06 March, 2021, 09:42:10 AM
Sorry.
Not sure if my first and third images came out...



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Offline Art

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #4 on: 06 March, 2021, 10:27:26 AM
Tyre fitting is the only work, apart from the MOT, I take my motorcycle to the garage for. I buy the tyres online at TyreLeader, take the loose wheel and tyre in and they fit, balance and dispose of the old tyre for 10 which includes the VAT. At the rate I get through tyres having my own tyre fitting equipment would be a 100,000 mile pay back on cost, on top of that there is the storage issue.


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Offline knapdog

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #5 on: 06 March, 2021, 11:00:04 AM
Last time I took a wheel to have a tyre fitted was when I had my R1200RT.
They made a gash on the rim that cost me close to 150 to get fixed. Took me months to get the money out of him plus two weeks before BMW fixed the wheel.
Never again.

I reckon I'd start making a saving in three years. I'll be making 20 saving straight away as my biffer needs two tyres soon.
I get a lot of satisfaction in doing my own work where I can and changing the tyres would be no hardship for me, plus, I'd be more than happy to help out a couple of pals along the way. I'm sure I'd be rewarded with the odd pint or two.  :031:
Last Edit: 06 March, 2021, 11:08:39 AM by knapdog
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Offline Art

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #6 on: 06 March, 2021, 12:04:16 PM
OK, I've misread this post. My calculation was based on Steelworkers 180 Abba tyre change kit. Do you have the Sealey TC969 bead breaker and the Motion Pro bead breakers or the Michelin 15" tyre levers? Either way its still a high mileage payback and storage issue for me but if it works for you I'm the last person to knock it.

Reminiscing now of back in the day changing Dunlop TT100's and inner tubes on the Norton with nothing more than a pair of 9" tyre levers, we'd break the beads with a booted foot and because the rims were of the tyre/inner tube design they were never that tight on the rims. The tyres had an internal sidewall to rim clamp to stop them spinning on the rim and ripping the inner tube apart, a proper challenge to fit and get the sidewall aligned correctly to the rim, balancing was done by means of lead solder wire wound around the spokes - Happy days.
Last Edit: 06 March, 2021, 12:28:14 PM by Art

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Offline knapdog

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #7 on: 06 March, 2021, 12:09:07 PM
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
OK, I've misread this post. My calculation was based on Steelworkers 180 Abba tyre change kit. Do you have the Sealey TC969 bead breaker and the Motion Pro bead breakers or the Michelin 15" tyre levers? Either way its still a high mileage payback and storage issue for me but if it works for you I'm the last person to knock it.

Reminiscing now of back in the day changing Dunlop TT100's and inner tubes on the Norton with nothing more than a pair of 9" tyre levers, we'd break the beads with a booted foot and because the rims were of the tyre/inner tube design they were never that tight on the rims. The tyres had an internal sidewall to rim clamp to stop them spinning on the rim and ripping the inner tube apart, a proper challenge to fit and get the sidewall aligned correctly to the rim, balancing was done by means of lead solder wire wound around the spokes.

No, Art, I don't have any of the three items above.  I was hoping someone may have used them for an opinion.
I have had a thought. Would a Black and Decker Workmate squeeze tight enough to break the beads, I wonder?
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Offline knapdog

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #8 on: 06 March, 2021, 03:26:20 PM
^^^ Just checked. Workmate jaws only open 100mm, so answer is NO.
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Offline Art

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Re: Tyre levers and bead breakers
Reply #9 on: 06 March, 2021, 05:23:47 PM
In the past I have used a block of wood and a club hammer to break beads but not with tubeless tyres where the beads can be very much tighter than tyres with tubes. If you want an idea how difficult it is to break a tubeless bead check out this video where the fitter looks to be struggling using a massive four foot of leverage.