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Offline Scootyman

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #40 on: 14 November, 2020, 10:49:35 PM »
For what it’s worth, I have used Smith and Allen 10w-30 motorcycle semi synth at £48 for 20 litres and it’s fine. Whoever mentioned about the ‘marketing factor’ is correct. This engine has been around a long time and I’m sure as has been stated, it was designed to use semi synth rather than fully synth oil. If you look at the API specification it’s quite an old one for the CBF which indicates to me that most motorcycle oil is fine as newer specs supersede the older ones.
All good then
« Last Edit: 14 November, 2020, 10:50:30 PM by Scootyman »

Offline Crispy

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #41 on: 23 November, 2020, 08:18:04 PM »
Ok, I emailed Putoline to explain the difference in semi and fully synthetic oil but got no reply. I’ve found this description from Halfords, but it should be noted that this is for car oil, not motorcycle oil.

Semi synthetic oil or fully synthetic oil?

Synthetic oils are specifically manufactured to provide consistent, superior performance. Their main advantage over mineral oils is that they protect the engine across a far wider range of temperatures - up to an engine's maximum temperature and beyond. They do not have the impurities found in mineral oils or degrade as quickly, and they are thinner, helping to improve fuel efficiency.

Semi synthetic oil

Semi synthetic oils are cheaper than fully synthetic as they are a mixture of synthetic and mineral oil. Engines requiring semi synthetic oil must use at least semi synthetic oil (not mineral oil) but may benefit from upgrading to fully synthetic oil for increased protection and performance.

Fully synthetic oil

As the name suggests, fully synthetic oils are purely synthetic with no mineral oil. They offer the highest levels of performance and are an essential requirement for many modern engines.


https://www.halfords.com/car-servicing/advice/semi-synthetic-and-fully-synthetic-oil.html


Also re: 10w30 and 10w40. The highest average temperature for the UK and Spain (Barcelona) is 18.7 degrees Celsius and 25 degrees Celsius respectively. 10w30 it is.
Soichiro Honda, I salute you.

Offline Crispy

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #42 on: 23 November, 2020, 08:41:55 PM »
*Originally Posted by Scootyman [+]
This engine has been around a long time and I’m sure as has been stated, it was designed to use semi synth rather than fully synth oil. If you look at the API specification it’s quite an old one for the CBF which indicates to me that most motorcycle oil is fine as newer specs supersede the older ones.
All good then

But remember that the Biffer engine is based on the revvy 160bhp CBR1000RR Fireblade, detuned and under stressed down to 97bhp, courtesy of lower compression, smaller throttle bodies and different cams.

Here’s what MCN say about it.

It delivers polished, glitch-free 180mph potency with almost no effort and yet blends this not just with the expected Honda build quality and class, but also a fat, hum-dinger, wheelie-pulling midrange that makes it more sheer fun than any since the 92 original Honda Fireblade.

Sewing-machine-like, free-revving effectiveness is what we’d boringly become used to with Honda CBR1000RR Fireblades. This reworked, stomping midrange laden, explosive weapon changes all that. 100mph wheelies have never been so easy as on the lates Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade. Yet the Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade is also idiot-proof, docile and real-world responsive, too.

169.5bhp @ 11,250rpm.


Soichiro Honda, I salute you.

Offline Rick

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #43 on: 25 November, 2020, 09:30:18 PM »
Just purchased, free delivery, 4 litres of Castrol Power 1 Racing 4 (fully synthetic engine oil) for £21.49 from Euro Car Parts, half price. Great value and offer still on. I have used this oil for the last 6 years but I can't recall buying it this cheap. (10w-30)

Rick
« Last Edit: 25 November, 2020, 09:33:36 PM by Rick »

Offline Scootyman

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #44 on: 28 November, 2020, 02:09:22 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
But remember that the Biffer engine is based on the revvy 160bhp CBR1000RR Fireblade, detuned and under stressed down to 97bhp, courtesy of lower compression, smaller throttle bodies and different cams.

Here’s what MCN say about it.

It delivers polished, glitch-free 180mph potency with almost no effort and yet blends this not just with the expected Honda build quality and class, but also a fat, hum-dinger, wheelie-pulling midrange that makes it more sheer fun than any since the 92 original Honda Fireblade.

Sewing-machine-like, free-revving effectiveness is what we’d boringly become used to with Honda CBR1000RR Fireblades. This reworked, stomping midrange laden, explosive weapon changes all that. 100mph wheelies have never been so easy as on the lates Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade. Yet the Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade is also idiot-proof, docile and real-world responsive, too.

169.5bhp @ 11,250rpm.

I’m sorry, I don’t follow your point. Honda say it’s fine to run a CBF1000 on semi synthetic so that should be good enough don’t you think?
I think people get a little bit pulled in and pressured by all of this marketing madness.
I remember running a Citroen Xsara Picasso diesel on Mobil1 for 180,000 miles before it went pop and then Citroen changed tact in which oil to use and recommended a C2 spec oil instead of a 10w30 semi synthetic. Turns out the oil was not low saps and that’s why it went bang but hey, if I got 180,000 miles out of my CBF1000 I’d be happy.
I’m sure the Putoline will be fine.

Offline Scootyman

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #45 on: 28 November, 2020, 02:35:34 PM »

Also re: 10w30 and 10w40. The highest average temperature for the UK and Spain (Barcelona) is 18.7 degrees Celsius and 25 degrees Celsius respectively. 10w30 it is.  “

I think the viscosity also has something to do with film strength between the moving parts so a 10w30 has a lighter film strength than a 10w40. Bit a simple one by all accounts because you could go too heavy with the oil and that have an adverse effect on performance too. Such an interesting one this when you start to read about it.

Offline Art

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #46 on: 28 November, 2020, 05:37:38 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
... re: 10w30 and 10w40. The highest average temperature for the UK and Spain (Barcelona) is 18.7 degrees Celsius and 25 degrees Celsius respectively. 10w30 it is.

I think you've lost many of our readers with those averages. Here in England the average monthly temperatures range from 0.9°C to 20.4°C. This may support choosing a 10W-30 multigrade, however, since the record monthly  highs and lows range from -26.1°C to 38.5°C choosing a 10W-40 multigrade may be the better option.

There will be no right or wrong answer here, it's an engine oil discussion and you pay your money, you make you choice. As far as I know nobody has ever offered any conclusive proof or demonstrated any failures due to using a 10W-40 over a 10W-30 engine oil or visa versa. I can justify my choice in choosing a 10W-40 engine oil because its -5°C to +40°C average temperature range specification better suits the average temperatures I ride in.

Climate of the UK