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Offline Crispy

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #20 on: 01 November, 2020, 08:12:03 PM »
*Originally Posted by vinciebhoy [+]
This prompts the question.
Would the stator last a bit longer if 10w30 was used, as oil flow would improve so cooling around the stator would improve?

*Originally Posted by Rick [+]
Interesting one this, for the above reasons I always use 10w30 Castrol Power 1 Racing, fully synthetic, topped up to maximum with the hope that being thinner and at max level it will give the stator the best chance of cooling. My bike is an 09 Mk 1 coming up to 20,000 miles on the original stator. I ride for at most 1.5 hours before stopping and putting it on the side stand  on mainly twisting bendy roads so in my view the stator has the best chance of cooling.

From what I’ve read the stator fry’s up, so that can only mean overheating or the copper wires are poor quality or too thin. But why doesn’t the Fireblade have the same problem?
Soichiro Honda, I salute you.

Offline Art

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #21 on: 01 November, 2020, 08:36:58 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
And remember your 8 litres of Motul oil has a shelf life even if you don’t open it. Best get cracking with those 8,000 miles.
 :305:

I got it in based on pre COVID19 mileage and despite being retired I still do a little private for a select few of lucky individuals, shelf life won't be an issue.

*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
From what I’ve read the stator fry’s up, so that can only mean overheating or the copper wires are poor quality or too thin. But why doesn’t the Fireblade have the same problem?

It did. Stator failure is a reoccurring theme across many motorcycle manufacturers and if the solution was as simple as specifying a lower viscosity, freer flowing, fully synthetic engine oil do you not think Honda, Triumph, Suzuki, Kawasaki and Yamahaha would have gone that route many years ago?

Offline Crispy

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #22 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:18:36 PM »
If the stator is frying up it must be something to do with the cooling of it. As I understand it, the stator generates heat when the copper reacts with the magnets whilst spinning round. I can’t imagine that its cooled with the water cooling system, so it must be cooled with the oil. How that happens I don’t know? Does it spin in a bath of oil or is it sprayed on, or does it even come into contact with oil and spin dry?

There’s only been two recalls to Honda for the MK1 Biffer.

31/5/2011 - Hace top box may detach

19/11/2009 - Rear brake may become inoperative

Maybe the faulty stator is a bit of a myth?
Soichiro Honda, I salute you.

Offline Art

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #23 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:20:59 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
Doesn't fully synthetic engine oil start out life as a mineral oil base stock?

*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
I’m no expert but apparently the synthetic base oil is a mix of ester and polyalphaolefin...

I expected you to research it but hey ho here's the shocker - Putoline themselves describe their fully synthetic N-TECH® PRO R+ 10W-30 engine oil as "Highly refined mineral oil" albeit with additives. Which means that it is of a similar composition as any other fully synthetic engine oil :169:

Straight from the horses mouth here


Offline Shed

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #24 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:30:58 PM »
No shocker there Art, as I pointed out earlier there is no agreed international industry standard on what constitutes 'fully synthetic'. Different manufacturers with different semi and fully synthetic blends will all have differing amounts of mineral/synthetic base stock ingredients.

Despite what it says on the label, NONE of it is 'Fully' synthetic.

Will it hurt the bike? No.

Will it hurt your wallet? Probably.

« Last Edit: 01 November, 2020, 09:34:58 PM by Shed »

Offline Shed

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #25 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:43:44 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
And remember your 8 litres of Motul oil has a shelf life even if you don’t open it.

Most manufacturers specify a 'use by' date as between 2-5 years, depending on how/where the oil was stored, and the type of oil it is. Then (allegedly) the stuff will start to break down and the additives etc, won't work as well as intended.

I reckon if you can't use your stored oil within that time frame, you're definitely buying too much of it in the first place. :164:


Subjective, and ignoring the obvious fact of you buying more oil keeps the manufacturers happy, but I know of people who've used oil a lot older than 5 years and never had any bother.

Offline Crispy

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #26 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:49:38 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
Putoline themselves describe their fully synthetic N-TECH® PRO R+ 10W-30 engine oil as "Highly refined mineral oil" albeit with additives. Which means that it is of a similar composition as any other fully synthetic engine oil :169:


Well yes, “refined” would mean to purify the oil from impurities. Synthetic would mean a synthesis of a organic product with a artificial one, which would arguably give the fully synthetic oil superior wear and friction control, longevity, shear strength, viscosity indices and better levels of cleaning. All this would translate to more power and fuel economy, more cooling, less engine wear (noise).

With this in mind, I’d be more sceptical about semi-synthetic. What on earth is that?


Soichiro Honda, I salute you.

Offline Art

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #27 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:53:10 PM »
Thanks Shed. The shocker was for Crispy and the oil will definitely be used within its service life.

On the stator front I'm not sure how the stator is oil cooled. When removing the stator casing it has an oil tight gasket and the stator has a light coating of engine oil about it but there is no oil inside to drain out. I think what happens is engine oil flows into the casing, over the flywheel/stator assembly and drains out at the bottom. here you can see the amount of oil inside the casing and the oily failed stator

Offline Shed

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #28 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:55:26 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]

With this in mind, I’d be more sceptical about semi-synthetic. What on earth is that?

It's a blend of mineral & synthetic.

Offline Shed

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Re: CBF Engine Oil 10W30 vs 10W40 Synthetic vs Mineral
« Reply #29 on: 01 November, 2020, 09:58:12 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
Thanks Shed. The shocker was for Crispy and the oil will definitely be used within its service life.

On the stator front I'm not sure how the stator is oil cooled. When removing the stator casing it has an oil tight gasket and the stator has a light coating of engine oil about it but there is no oil inside to drain out. I think what happens is engine oil flows into the casing, over the flywheel/stator assembly and drains out at the bottom. here you can see the amount of oil inside the casing and the oily failed stator


Correct Art. The oil flows through the engine passageways and passes through the flywheel holes, thus 'cooling' the stator as it flows by. Unless the oil is the same temperature, or higher temperature than the stator itself, in which case presumably no cooling whatsoever will take place at that particular given time.


« Last Edit: 01 November, 2020, 10:04:07 PM by Shed »