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Offline Steelworker

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Cable lubrication.
« on: 27 July, 2020, 10:31:26 AM »
Hi all,
Thought I'd lubricate the throttle cables but need to know if they can be simply detached from the switch housing just enough to fit the lubricating gaget or will it involve the whole cable removal proceedure as in Haynes manual i.e.fairing off and releasing from throttle bodies.
Appriciate info.from anyone who's done this.

Offline WileyCoyote

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #1 on: 27 July, 2020, 01:01:30 PM »
Good question,   :084:
I believe the cable outers are lined internally with PTFE, or similar, so additional lubrication is unnecessary and maybe detrimental.
That maybe "dealer speak", of course, meaning "we can't be bothered".  So, in eleven years no lubrication has been applied, as far as I'm aware.  Certainly not in the last six years when I have sorted routine servicing.
However, I don't use it through the winter period but it has received a fair battering, weather wise, throughout Europe during my eleven years with it.  No probs so far  !  :028:

Offline Art

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #2 on: 27 July, 2020, 01:44:46 PM »
 :211: Inspection of the throttle operation is part of the Honda recommended 8,000 mile service and includes "Lubricate the throttle cables, if throttle operation is not smooth" SECTION 4 MAINTENANCE pages 4 & 6 of the workshop manual.

I lubricate my throttle cables by separating the switch halves to access the inner cables, applying lubricant direct to the inner cables and using the throttle action to get the lubrication moving down the cable. Re-greasing the cable nipples before re-assembly.

You won't get enough slack to fit a cable lubricating gizmo or remove the twist grip to grease the tube. I've never tried and never needed to but you may be able to get enough slack in the cables to remove the twist grip giving more access to the inner cables and/or the twist grip tube by removing the handle bar bolts and displacing the handlebar, be careful not to put too much strain on the wiring and hoses.


Offline WileyCoyote

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #3 on: 27 July, 2020, 02:09:33 PM »
Thanks Art.  Suitably chastened    :192:

Throttle operation still wonderfully smooth, thankfully, but another item for inclusion on the next service list.
Which lubricant do you prefer for putting down the cable run  ?

Cheers.

Paul

Offline Steelworker

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #4 on: 27 July, 2020, 02:54:39 PM »
Thanks guys, I've had my bike 11 years and 32,000 miles and throttle action is still smooth so no urgency with this. I will however give Art's method a go as with lockdown still on, my bike's not going anywhere soon anyway!

Offline Art

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #5 on: 27 July, 2020, 03:09:56 PM »
To be fair a throttle cable is not so critical and many will argue a modern throttle cable will last for years and years and is unlikely to suddenly fail. Therefore they're happy to leave it alone and wait until the cable shows signs of deterioration or damage and replace it. Nothing wrong in that but I'm in favour of the preventative maintenance approach and at 14 years old my original cables are probably as smooth as any. They've been lubricated every 8,000 miles and are in use on the road all year in all weathers, avoiding ice and snow as much as possible.

Offline Philby21

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #6 on: 27 July, 2020, 09:40:42 PM »
Not sure if it helps but I used to be a high mileage rider, I've put over 100,000 miles each on two different bikes (CBR600 and a 929 Fireblade) and I have never, not even once, lubricated the cables and they've never been an issue.  Well, I tried it once and it was such a faff that I never tried it again!  :008:

Maybe I've been lucky, who knows?

Phil

Offline paul.chucky

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #7 on: 08 August, 2020, 09:02:59 PM »
Lubrication is always a good thing  :046: :046: :046:
waters wet s**t stinks

Offline NJD

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Re: Cable lubrication.
« Reply #8 on: 08 August, 2020, 09:56:43 PM »
Lubricating throttle cables on the CBF 1000 isn't that hard, and it all comes down to attention to detail when putting things back together.

I've had the cable fully out of the housing to use one of those lubrication tools in the past, but I was fitting heated grips at the time so was a two-in-one job. Nothing difficult about it. Just remove all slack on throttle cable to increase free-play before removing switchgear. Careful not to break the throttle grip tube slots when removing cables.

Wind the adjuster all the way down (towards the front of the bike) upon reassembly and start the bike. Adjust 360* (one full turn) at a time testing the throttle for automatic snap bag (no snagging / high revs) in the various positions (handlebar full lock left, straight and full lock right) with the engine running and bike in neutral on centre stand or sitting on it. I found full lock to the right caused more cable snagging than straight or full lock left, so used that to determine when I was out of the "un-safe / too tight" zone and fine tuned from there. Don't panic about the fact the engine will rev on its own until you add enough slack. Use a dot on the top of the adjuster to know when you've done one full turn (marker, nail varnish etc).

~

Lazy owners that don't even get their local garage to do the basics of maintenance is the main reason I never use any "new-to-me" bike before I've lubricated, or looked at, all the pivot points and basic service consumables. Why would I risk being at the side of the road with an issue god knows how many miles away from home on a warm day when I could take the time to look at it from the comfort of home on a warm day over a period of time, and then regular cleaning of the things that gunk up the most (chain, brake calipers etc) as it gets ridden?

Just because something works doesn't mean it shouldn't be looked at. If you've not got a definite service history on that item and have the tools, time and knowledge I'd do it for the experience in itself.

 


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