Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: chain adjuster positioning  (Read 1807 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline marky99925

  • CBF Member
  • **
  • Posts: 39
  • Bike: cbf1000
  • City / Town: limerick
  • Country: ireland
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #10 on: 12 May, 2020, 02:58:10 PM »
Thanks guys
I've had very few problems over 5 years other than a few minor niggles, but then  i am an awkward pedantic ba****d when it comes to my bike.
They have just replied as follows (it's lee honda in Cork:)

Hi Mark,
There must be enough freeplay on the chain as the workshop would of pointed out
if the chain was lacking feeeplay. There is a possibility that the sprocket combination
may of been changed slightly when the distributor supplied them hence the slight difference in the chain.
I can't check the sprocket combination at this stage as they are supplied as a kit but if the
workshop thought there was any problem they would point that out at fitment time.
Check the freeplay in the chain to ensure that there is the required amount.
Regards

really? check the freeplay? bloody hell, after 40 years on bikes i never thought to do that..what the hell do they take me for?
The sprocket story is cobblers, the rear sprocket is 43 teeth as standard.
I've told them im off to honda customer services for their opinion, and, having been a debt collector for 30 years i'll see them in the smal claims court if it comes to it, all  because of
one chain link, on their own heads be it. They might yet settle it once they realise i'm not going away.
Thanks to all
Marky

Offline WileyCoyote

  • CBF Member
  • **
  • Posts: 65
  • Bike: CBF1000A GT
  • City / Town: Cheshire
  • Country: UK
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #11 on: 12 May, 2020, 05:16:13 PM »
Hi Mark,
More standard dealer speak per their customer services training dep't which works on the premise that the customer always  knows less than themselves.
Maybe if they sent him just up the road to kiss that famous stone he might be more convincing...?

Still comes back to the Honda "Bible" (workshop manual) which specifies 120 links not 118 which . in theory, is what we pay for and therefore have a right to expect.  Perhaps they don't want to be Honda dealers anymore... !

Go get 'em,  Honda Central don't like to be contradicted.

Best regards,

Paul

Online Art

  • CBF Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
  • Bike: SC58 CBF1000 A-6
  • City / Town: Shoreditch
  • Country: England
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #12 on: 13 May, 2020, 07:35:44 AM »
For my two three penneth

1) I think it is reasonable to expect a Honda dealership, or any other professional workshop, to fit parts such as drive chain and sprockets as per the manufacturers specification - 16 tooth front sprocket, 43 tooth rear sprocket and a 120 link chain. Anything outside of that specification is unacceptable.

2) Do you have a rear hugger fitted? Reducing the chain length by two links means that the rear wheel is repositioned 5/8" (16 mm) into the swingarm, on my bike that would cause the tyre to come in contact with the hugger.

3) Question (beyond my pay grade) what effect does reducing the wheelbase by 5/8" (16mm) have on solo, two up and two up plus luggage riding?

Offline davidjg

  • CBF Member
  • **
  • Posts: 73
  • Bike: CBF1000FA-C GT
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: England
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #13 on: 14 May, 2020, 11:35:18 AM »
Hi. Please complain to Honda. I had to complain about a Honda dealer service 3 years ago ( with photos of what they had screwed up) and albeit the dealer rectified their mis-service I got £50 compensation back from Honda pretty quickly and a promise they would investigate the dealer - but  did not receive the result of any investigation they made, Cannot find the email of whom in Honda I sent the complaint to, or their reply, but I remember having to look it up on their website. The defects with my service were not as safety related as yours, and if I were you I would tell Honda  that as their dealer has not carried out the chain replacement to specified Honda standards that your safety in using the bike is highly debateable and if any accident etc is caused by the incorrect chain, you and any other parties would have cause to pursue legal action against them and their dealer.
You have been through enough hassle with your dealer, one simple email and you may get the work remedied + compensation.

Online Art

  • CBF Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
  • Bike: SC58 CBF1000 A-6
  • City / Town: Shoreditch
  • Country: England
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #14 on: 15 May, 2020, 06:15:45 AM »
Thinking back to my days in a Honda dealership workshop all replacement parts would be checked, checked and checked again. The service department and/or the parts department would check the part numbers match the model specification and raise a job card, the fitter would check the issued parts match the part numbers on the job card. After disassembly and before fitting the new parts the fitter would physically check the new parts against the old parts. In the case of a drive chain and sprocket kit this would involve laying the new sprockets against the old sprockets and physically checking size, bore etc. Same check with the chains which would be laid out side by side to physically check size, length etc. Any discrepancy being brought to the attention of the workshop foreman/managers attention to resolve. It should be impossible for an incorrect part to be fitted, so how does a 118 link chain get fitted in place of a 120 link chain?

If I was a gambling man I'd wager the job and a 120 link chain was given to an apprentice, improver or a mechanic in a rush who over flared the rivet creating a seized link, rather than bring his school boy error to the attention of the workshop foreman/manager he covers it up by removing the two now seized links and fits the now 118 link chain. This happens and it happens more often than you'd think.


Offline Shed

  • CBF Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 355
  • City / Town: Newcastle
  • Country: UK
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #15 on: 15 May, 2020, 07:07:29 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
what effect does reducing the wheelbase by 5/8" (16mm) have on solo, two up and two up plus luggage riding?

I suspect nowt that us mere mortal riders would notice.  :084:

If you consider a chain 'adjusted' either too tight, or too slack from the correct spec, (the Biffer adjustment giving you a scope of approx up to 1 inch range on the adjusters being between too tight & too slack), this would correspondingly give you a wheelbase which, again, is either too long, or too short from the correct spec. Of course generally a shorter wheelbase would give you more lively responsive handling particularly when cornering, with, conversely, poorer handling at speed. But, would you really notice any difference with such a small change in the wheelbase range? I highly doubt it.  :110:

Additionally, if you're loaded up with a pillion, luggage, and the obligatory sandwiches and pies in the top box, this extra weight will easily offset any handling gains you may have (conceptually) had from the minutiae of the shorter wheelbase change.

Offline marky99925

  • CBF Member
  • **
  • Posts: 39
  • Bike: cbf1000
  • City / Town: limerick
  • Country: ireland
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #16 on: 17 May, 2020, 07:09:29 PM »
Hi all
To close this off, after initial reluctance, they have now booked me in to change the chain FOC a week on Tuesday, 26th May, i think maybe copying them in on an email to Honda Ireland may have had some effect...

Can't wait to see if they get it right this time......

Offline FLIZ

  • CBF Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 88
  • Bike: Honda CBF1000A9
  • City / Town: North Yorkshire
  • Country: England
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #17 on: 17 May, 2020, 07:39:29 PM »
 :028: Well done, fingers crossed they get it right this time.
 Let us know how you get on.

Offline WileyCoyote

  • CBF Member
  • **
  • Posts: 65
  • Bike: CBF1000A GT
  • City / Town: Cheshire
  • Country: UK
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #18 on: 19 May, 2020, 12:40:05 PM »
Good one Mark,
Perseverance pays off again.    :062:

Offline marky99925

  • CBF Member
  • **
  • Posts: 39
  • Bike: cbf1000
  • City / Town: limerick
  • Country: ireland
Re: chain adjuster positioning
« Reply #19 on: 19 May, 2020, 04:56:04 PM »
Thanks guys
Unfortunately the moral here is: trust nothing, check everything before you ride away if possible. i know i will be now.
I've spent the lockdown learning to do more and more myself and not be lazy, very rewarding, cheap, and, above all you know it's right!
Most regular jobs are not Ph D level, take your time and give it a go.

Cheers

Marky

 


diverse-leafy