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Offline motorhead13

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Newbee - first Honda
« on: 15 April, 2020, 10:22:58 AM »
Hi all

Just got my 06 CBF a few weeks ago, not good timing for a bike bought for touring type journeys!!
Its my first Honda. Traded in my SV650 for it, I also have a ZX6r and a Yamaha XS400 which I've chopped into a bobber type thing.

I got the bike as wanted something better suited to longer journeys than what I had. I've done a couple of runs up the road and feels comfortable and easy to use, so looking forward to getting my hands on it properly.

Would appreciate any tips or advice on keeping the bike such as maintenance or any gremlins to watch out for, and also any useful mods. I was thinking of a belly pan and maybe a bigger screen for long journeys?

Cheers

Offline Art

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #1 on: 15 April, 2020, 11:25:38 AM »
That'll be a CBF 1000 A-6 (SC58 with the SC57E engine) or a MKI as is known around these parts. An excellent all rounder that ticks many boxes, a good choice.

On the maintenance front its a Honda the only maintenance tips are having a regular maintenance schedule, down load the manual and follow the Honda maintenance schedule in section 4 and you won't go far wrong. Spark plugs and valve clearances I leave until the 32,000 mile service, replacing the spark plugs with NGK's CR8EHIX-9 (iridium/nickel) plugs then I can forget about them and the valves for 48,000 mile (80,000 mile service).

No doubt someone will be along soon bleating on about stator failure. Its true some stators have been known to fail, its also true some stators have been replaced for no good reason other than peace of mind. Some have also been known to carry the likes of spare stators and regulator/rectifiers on tour. If you must and/or for peace of mind check the charging system at every 4,000 mile service (>13v at 2,500 RPM and <14v at 5,000 RPM) and note the results for future reference.

If not already done you can download the workshop manual from here or here

Happy Days
« Last Edit: 15 April, 2020, 11:28:36 AM by Art »

Offline motorhead13

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #2 on: 15 April, 2020, 03:15:25 PM »
Good to know I made a good choice.
I was looking at a big Bandit but the honda seemed a better choice and better components mechanically.

Thanks for the info. I had to change a regulator on the SV as they were a known weak spot, so I'll watch out for that.Thanks for the manuals, that's the first thing I want to find when I get a new bike.

Would a belly pan be useful or is it more cosmetic? How about a radiator cover as I can see the paint isn't the best?

Offline Art

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #3 on: 15 April, 2020, 03:25:25 PM »
I've never had a belly pan and I've taken some of my mo'cycles through some rough terrain


Offline Crispy

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #4 on: 15 April, 2020, 07:01:01 PM »
*Originally Posted by motorhead13 [+]
Would a belly pan be useful or is it more cosmetic? How about a radiator cover as I can see the paint isn't the best?


A fender extender is more effective and cheaper. Still, a belly pan would be worth adding if the lower front of the engine near the oil pump is still clean, or if not, you want to hide it. I took my radiator cover off and the fan didnít cut in as much, it seemed to restrict the air flow through the radiator fins. Thereís a lot less heat coming up through the engine into my body now, would be unbearable in summer.
A day without learning is a day wasted

Offline motorhead13

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #5 on: 20 April, 2020, 11:15:45 AM »
Thanks for the info guys, good to know about the radiator and possible air flow restrictions.
Might get a belly pan for the look and maybe keeping it a bit cleaner underneath.

Offline oldtimer03

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #6 on: 20 April, 2020, 11:57:03 AM »
Hi MotŲrhead. Just to add my two penny worth, rad guards do obviously restrict airflow, but they can (and are) fitted on most modern bikes  with no detriment to the mechanicals. Iíve had a Beowulf stainless steel rad guard on my Mk1 since new, (9 yrs), with no problems. As Monty Python said to the General about his tanks, things happen donít they, stones make holes.... a rad guard is protection money. A new rad is £500. Something to consider.
Crispy is dead right about a fender extender, and even though rear huggers for the biffer donít generally get top marks, they are vital to keep most of the crud off the shock. Both are v.good add-ons.
Anyway, the biffer is a great bike and generally very reliable and a typical Honda quality build. Youíll love it. Cheers.

Offline motorhead13

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Re: Newbee - first Honda
« Reply #7 on: 23 April, 2020, 05:01:38 PM »
Thanks oldtimer appreciate your two penny worth, that stuff is good to know.Will look at a rad guard and huggers. I think they're pretty important on most bikes to help keep the muck off.
Anyone changed screens or fitted bigger ones for touring, or not needed?