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Offline broady

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #10 on: 13 April, 2020, 07:18:28 PM »
*Originally Posted by Shed [+]
And don't forget to change the brake fluid too.  :028:

I cannot see how you would change lines without changing fluid.lol

Offline Shed

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #11 on: 13 April, 2020, 08:08:30 PM »
*Originally Posted by broady [+]
I cannot see how you would change lines without changing fluid.lol

Easy. New lines. Use the old fluid. If it turns out you're a bit short after draining, simply top up with some tap water.

Offline Crispy

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #12 on: 13 April, 2020, 10:32:50 PM »
Shed - swoosh, that one went right over my head  :188:

Had a look at the lines this afternoon and they look pretty much like new. It’s just the metal bits near the callipers that let it down. Now thinking of new banjo bolts and good old elbow grease to get them back to something better. Replacing the brake lines looks very complicated on a ABS model. Definitely not for the home mechanic, IMO. Costs for labour and parts would be approx 500 to 600 with new pads and brake fluid, I reckon.

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Offline Shed

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #13 on: 13 April, 2020, 11:52:13 PM »
The quip about changing the brake fluid, and the tap water, was in jest. Perhaps I should have used the correct smiley!  :212:

It isn't actually a particularly difficult job for a competent spanner monkey. However, If you have any doubts about doing (any part) of the brakes yourself, give it to someone who knows how. Nothing to stop you getting yourself involved and learning about how to do it though.

If the lines are in good order, get your elbow primed up and polish away. You mention the banjo bolts, which are cheap as chips, for e.g:
https://www.wemoto.com/bikes/honda/cbf_1000_a7_a8_sc58b_abs_model/07-08/picture/banjo_bolt_for_front_master_cylinder_single_hose_stainless_steel

As for brake fluid, that's only about £6.00 a litre at eurocarparts. That's enough to do all the brake lines, and the clutch too.

New pads all round, about £60.00 for 3 sets EBC FA388HH, or £30 ish for 3 sets of Goldfren AD257.

Also, try https://wezmoto.com for braided brake lines & clutch lines.
£175 (if this is your model) https://wezmoto.com/product/honda-cbf1000-abs-a6-aa-2006-2010-oem-standard-layout/

Add another £23 for a clutch line.

£230 - £265 + the cost of someone to fit them for you. (If you went down that route).



Offline Crispy

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #14 on: 14 April, 2020, 07:35:51 PM »
Hi Shed, the phrase “went right over my head” means you/I missed the meaning or it didn’t register properly. It looks like my post went right over your head, too  :008:

I thought it was only women who hate innuendo?

Anyway, sod tap water, just bought some distilled water for them brake lines  :150:

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Offline Art

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #15 on: 15 April, 2020, 02:40:42 AM »
Don't forget to mix it 50:50 with DOT4  :087:

Offline Biffmk1

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #16 on: 17 April, 2020, 11:59:18 PM »
I changed mine recently, got mine from wezmoto. They were by far the cheapest and my father in law has them on 2 of his bikes and rates them. I have a mk1 abs model also. The fronts join just above the rad and the rear under the rider seat. It was an easy job. I changed mine in the Hope's of better performance but they're just the same, I've accepted the brakes are just turd (also changed pads). Unless one of you fine lot know some tips or tricks to improve them. They do look good though, I got carbon coated with the stainless banjos and bolts. They're spot on. Hope this helps  :028:

Offline Crispy

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #17 on: 18 April, 2020, 09:50:19 AM »
*Originally Posted by Biffmk1 [+]
I changed mine recently, got mine from wezmoto. They were by far the cheapest and my father in law has them on 2 of his bikes and rates them. I have a mk1 abs model also. The fronts join just above the rad and the rear under the rider seat. It was an easy job. I changed mine in the Hope's of better performance but they're just the same, I've accepted the brakes are just turd (also changed pads). Unless one of you fine lot know some tips or tricks to improve them. They do look good though, I got carbon coated with the stainless banjos and bolts. They're spot on. Hope this helps  :028:

Thanks Biffmk1, that’s very helpful and they’re fifty quid cheaper than the Hel ones. These are definitely worth considering. I’ve just got a bit of concern about the brake fluid with all this talk of flushing out the old fluid with new, mines a ABS model. More time reading up on the forum beckons.

 :028:
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Offline Crispy

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #18 on: 18 April, 2020, 09:56:17 AM »
Also could you tell me if the lines come with the square bits in the middle or do the lines need to be plumbed into them?Cheers
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Offline Art

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Re: Brake Lines
« Reply #19 on: 18 April, 2020, 12:01:10 PM »
Brake fluid flushing vs draining

The Honda workshop manual instruction is to drain the system. The Haynes workshop manual instruction is to flush the system to replace and to drain the system only for a full overall. Both recommend a vacuum type brake bleeding kit and both describe an alternative manual bleeding method.

I've never drained the CBF1000 ABS hydraulic brake system but there are some on here who have and have reported problems with air locks in the ABS module. Their theory is that the air locks occur because the the ABS module sits higher than the bleed nipples and rear brake fluid reservoir. I've never experienced this, then again I've never drained the system on a CBF 1000A.

If you flush then no air enters the system, sure flushing will not get 100% of the old fluid out but neither does draining, flushing will get enough of the old fluid out. So how do you flush when fitting new lines? I'd replace the lines before the ABS module first one section at a time, priming each new section with fresh DOT4 before fitting, keeping the reservoir topped up to minimise the risk of air entering the primed lines then flush bleed each newly replaced section before moving on to the next. Replacing the lines after the ABS module in a similar way. OK so you'll end up bleeding the system several times but is that better than any potential grief? I'd not be too concerned about bleeding a drained system, I've drained and manually bleed ABS systems before without issue (not CBF1000A systems) whether those claiming that it is an impossible job are right or wrong its probably worth while heeding to their caution.

If your brakes do end up a little spongy it could be because you've handled the fluid too roughly, let the fluid sit for 24 hours before use and then pour slowly to minimise the risk of air entering the fluid as it sloshes about. One trick to firm up spongy brakes that seems to work, and I don't fully understand why it works, is to bungee tie the front brake on, not too tightly just enough to pressurise the system, leave it pressurised for 12 to 24 hours. The theory here is the pressure within the system will cause any air bubbles to float back into the reservoir. Its worked for me in the past.