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Offline Marcos1979

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #20 on: 01 March, 2020, 11:42:50 PM »
Hi Malc,

Thanks a lot for the information, I didn't know that Dyno tests would also check for sensor errors, I will definitely check it out when I am back from annual leave. It will be a detective work but I am sure I will get this sorted. Thank you once again buddy.

Offline weaver

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #21 on: 04 March, 2020, 12:55:40 PM »
Good to see you are still about and
Still enjoying riding your Bike.
Best wishes, Rev. Ken.
Weaver.
Bangkok.

Offline Marcos1979

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank - HELP *** SORTED ***
« Reply #22 on: 04 April, 2020, 09:43:22 PM »
Hi all,

Quick update on the Fuel consumption issue I had, my mechanic suggested to first change the air filter for a Honda original air-filter and this morning I done a test, done 210 miles and wow, what a difference on fuel consumption.  I was a little paranoid of running out of fuel so  when I got to the petrol I had 171.80 miles.

I am not too good in Maths so I was wondering if anyone with good math skills could help me out to check  in the fuel consumption calculation below is correct?

As I was saying, I got to the petrol station with 171.80 miles on the clock and filled the tank to the top with 15.39L. The bike does an average 46-48 mpg

19L The tank capacity in UK Gallons is 4.17

If I divide 15.39L by 4.17 Gl  = 3.69 Gl, when I multiply 3. by 46.6 mpg which falls in the average mpg fuel consumption I get 171.95 miles.

This figure 171.95 miles is very close to the 171.80 miles ridden when I got to the petrol station.

In the calculation above correct?

Thank you for your time.

Marcos

Offline g5guzzi

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #23 on: 04 April, 2020, 09:59:43 PM »
171.80 divided by 15.39=11.163092175 miles per litre multiplied by 4.5460= 50.747 miles per uk gallon
 nearly 51 miles per gallon
    looks like a good improvement.
i think you owe the mechanic a drink.
Malc

Offline Marcos1979

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #24 on: 04 April, 2020, 11:34:50 PM »
Hi Malc,

Thanks for your reply, It is hard to believer that the air filter was the cause for the issue...  When I done the diagnostics there was also a fault on the fuel injector and O2 sensor. DO you think is worth putting the bike on a dyno to check if the bike is functioning to it's best?

Many thanks,
Marcos.

Online Art

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #25 on: 05 April, 2020, 04:25:22 AM »
As above, there are 4.54 litres to the UK gallon, not to be confused with the lesser 3.8 litre US gallon. Therefore miles divided by litres multiplied by 4.54 equals UK MPG. Which is giving you what we're all getting, an indicated 51 MPG, note with a 5% speedo correction that dips to around 48 MPG in real money but happy days nonetheless.

A dodgy air filter! That's what comes of following the Honda service schedule to the letter.

AIR CLEANER

Remove and inspect the air cleaner element every 12,000 miles or 18 months whichever comes first. Service more frequently when riding in unusually wet or dusty areas. Clean the air cleaner element with compressed air from outside of the element.

Fair enough an air filter won't degrade over time but it will reach a point where it becomes so soiled it is no longer serviceable and requires replacement. Although the solution here almost seems as if the problem was with the brand of air filter rather than it being soiled beyond service. I'd be interested to know the brand of filter replaced and why your mechanic specified a Honda part?

I'd definitely be inclined to run the diagnostics again just to be sure the issues with the original stored codes have been resolved. You do know you can jump the Data Link Connector yourself to read any stored fault codes.

Offline Marcos1979

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #26 on: 05 April, 2020, 07:21:12 AM »
Hi Art,

Thanks a lot as always for your time and valuable input. I actually chance the airfilter every 5.000 miles and nver hadd a problem. The name of the brand of the presumably falty air-filter is  Hiflofiltro www.hiflofiltro.com.

My mechanich only suggested to replace with an original Honda air-filter and it looks like has sorted the issue. Now, as mentioned on my previous post I took the bike to a different mechanics for the diagnostic and I was told there was a fault with the O2 sensor, Throttle sensor and one faulty injector. They just verbally mentioned. Do you know how can I jump the Data Link Connector to read any stored fault codes? I would be grateful for your help.

I was also thinking to put the bike on a Dyno to see if they can spot the fault but I guess it will be too expensive.

Once again think you for your time.

Regards,
Marcos.

Online Art

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #27 on: 05 April, 2020, 08:29:02 AM »
Its mostly in the workshop manual Section 6 FUEL SYSTEM (PGM-FI), page 13 scroll down to "Reading DTC with the MIL" where it describes how to read the codes using the Honda SCS (Service Check Short) connector 070PZ-ZY30100, pattern connectors can be had off eBay. The codes are listed on page 16.

Links

CBF 1000-A FUEL SYSTEM PGM-FI

eBay pattern SCS Connector

Or its possible to read the Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC) by the PGM-FI Engine Check Lamp (MIL) with a jumper wire...

A.   Current Codes - If the PGM-FI engine check lamp is on with the engine idling engage neutral gear and put the side stand down. The PGM-FI lamp will start flashing any active codes.

B.   Stored Codes - If the engine PGM-FI check lamp is off you can read any stored codes as follows

Remove the seats. Locate the Data Link Connector (DLC) a 4P red socket that can be found below the riders seat bracket between the ABS modulator and main fuse box. It is covered by a dummy connector, depress the tab to remove it and you’ll see four female terminals, the wires are coloured

•   Black/white (12V switched live)
•   Orange/white (diagnostic)
•   Brown (Service Check Short)
•   Green (Chassis ground)

With the ignition switched off short the brown and green wire terminals with a jumper wire. Turn the ignition ON and watch the PGM-FI engine check lamp. If there are no codes stored the lamp will come on and stay on, if there are any stored codes the lamp will flash the DTC main code, the sub code cannot be flashed by the lamp.

The PGM-FI engine check lamp has two types of flash, a long 1.3 second flash and short half second flash. One long flash equals ten short flashes. For example, when two long flashes are followed by three short flashes, the DTC is 23 (two long flashes equals 20 plus the three short flashes equals 23). When the Engine Control Module (ECM) stores more than one DTC the lamp will flash the lowest code first. When finished turn the ignition switch off and remove the jumper wire.





Offline g5guzzi

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #28 on: 05 April, 2020, 08:56:41 PM »
*Originally Posted by Marcos1979 [+]
Hi Malc,

Thanks for your reply, It is hard to believer that the air filter was the cause for the issue...  When I done the diagnostics there was also a fault on the fuel injector and O2 sensor. DO you think is worth putting the bike on a dyno to check if the bike is functioning to it's best?

Many thanks,
Marcos.




Hi Marcos
if its running ok leave it alone. check for fault codes delete them if they are not active.
 if they are active you will not be able to delete them.
run the bike for a few hundred miles and see if they come back.
A loose connection or something disconnected when the ignition is on
will cause a fault code to be stored. if it keeps coming back it needs investigating.
  There where fault code erasers /readers for sale on ebay some with a switch which makes life easier

Malc


Offline Marcos1979

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Re: High Fuel consumption - 100 miles with per tank :(
« Reply #29 on: 06 April, 2020, 06:41:27 PM »
Hi Malc, Art

Thank you for your input buddy, I will ride for few hundred miles and check if the codes are reoccurring. I actually wanted to see the mechanics connecting the device to the bike so I can see for myself which codes are coming up but they don't let customers see them working on the benches.

Do you know a garage in London that would do this type of check?

Art has kindly sent the note below explaining how to read the codes but to be brutally honest is like Chinese to me, I am now very good with this things and I am don't want to burn my bike down by playing with the electric parts lol.

You guys are legends and I am ever so grateful for your support. :)


Its mostly in the workshop manual Section 6 FUEL SYSTEM (PGM-FI), page 13 scroll down to "Reading DTC with the MIL" where it describes how to read the codes using the Honda SCS (Service Check Short) connector 070PZ-ZY30100, pattern connectors can be had off eBay. The codes are listed on page 16.

Links

CBF 1000-A FUEL SYSTEM PGM-FI

eBay pattern SCS Connector

Or its possible to read the Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC) by the PGM-FI Engine Check Lamp (MIL) with a jumper wire...

A.   Current Codes - If the PGM-FI engine check lamp is on with the engine idling engage neutral gear and put the side stand down. The PGM-FI lamp will start flashing any active codes.

B.   Stored Codes - If the engine PGM-FI check lamp is off you can read any stored codes as follows

Remove the seats. Locate the Data Link Connector (DLC) a 4P red socket that can be found below the riders seat bracket between the ABS modulator and main fuse box. It is covered by a dummy connector, depress the tab to remove it and you’ll see four female terminals, the wires are coloured

•   Black/white (12V switched live)
•   Orange/white (diagnostic)
•   Brown (Service Check Short)
•   Green (Chassis ground)

With the ignition switched off short the brown and green wire terminals with a jumper wire. Turn the ignition ON and watch the PGM-FI engine check lamp. If there are no codes stored the lamp will come on and stay on, if there are any stored codes the lamp will flash the DTC main code, the sub code cannot be flashed by the lamp.

The PGM-FI engine check lamp has two types of flash, a long 1.3 second flash and short half second flash. One long flash equals ten short flashes. For example, when two long flashes are followed by three short flashes, the DTC is 23 (two long flashes equals 20 plus the three short flashes equals 23). When the Engine Control Module (ECM) stores more than one DTC the lamp will flash the lowest code first. When finished turn the ignition switch off and remove the jumper wire.




 


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