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Offline raYzerman

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #10 on: 03 August, 2019, 02:54:24 PM »
LOL, there's another guy whose videos I can't watch on another forum, thinks he's a mechanic but he's not, mostly just trying to draw attention to himself.  So much misinformation is spread by these types and I think it dangerous that the novices adopt some of this crap as gospel.  If you grew up wrenching stuff that's one thing, but if you're just learning, best stick to the proper service manuals, and if not clear, then ask away right here.
As for your spacer issue, I cannot see in the Haynes or Factory manual where it says leave a space.  In fact the opposite, when installing the bearing on one side, seat it, insert distance spacer and install the other bearing against it.  Makes perfect sense to me.  The entire sandwich (once the axle is installed and torqued up) will have zero gaps between any of the "distance collar", bearings, spacers and swingarm, and the bearings will (should) be fully seated where they belong.

Offline Art

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #11 on: 03 August, 2019, 04:19:08 PM »
The Honda manual makes no mention of any gap between the spacer and the bearings because the recommended procedures to remove and install the rear wheel bearings are carried out using specialist Honda workshop tools that do not require drifting the bearings from the opposite side of the hub, therefore any gap is of no consequence to the procedure.

The Haynes manual doesn't mention any gap either but the bearing must be a loose enough fit for it to be possible to 'move the spacer to one side' as per the instruction at 20.14 and the illustration which depicts a diagram of the spacer at sufficient an angle to the bearings so as to completely expose the bearings inner race. Haynes instruction at 20.14 also goes on to mention an alternative procedure using an internal expanding puller (this is the type of tool Honda use) if you can't get sufficient purchase. If you can't get sufficient purchase on the inner race it can only be because their is insufficient gap between the spacer and the bearings. This comes about when the rear wheel axel nut is torqued up to 70 lb ft.

The old bearings probably allowed the spacer more movement because they were worn and drying out of grease. The newly fitted bearings shouldn't have a gap, the way I'd describe it is 'fully seated loose fit'. To be sure if you remove the wheel I'm confident you'll find that having torqued the axel nut to 70 lb ft there is no gap.

Offline Shed

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #12 on: 03 August, 2019, 08:02:12 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
:431:

.... but in my first few years as a newbie I’ve nearly been ripped-off by motorcycle mechanics to the tune of well over a grand. Perhaps people do work on their machine because they no longer trust motorcycle garages.

No need to be sorry Crispy, fully understandable to be a bit wary.

Offline Shed

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #13 on: 03 August, 2019, 08:29:03 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crispy [+]
:431:

Del and Haynes say there should be a gap?

Well, Haynes manual doesn't actually say that at all. As Art & raYzerman have pointed out.

Also, if you look at the manual here, https://bob.ollis-brown.co.uk/manuals/cbf1000/2006-2008-CBF1000-A-15%20REAR%20WHEEL-SUSPENSION.pdf page 15-10, it clearly states the bearings on both sides are to be "fully seated" to the collar.

This means touching the collar, but not jammed so tight you can't move the spacer (or 'distance collar' as it is also bizarrely named) :187:. As Art & raYzerman say, you need to be able to shift the spacer ever so slightly, and if you have put the bearings in fully home, when you torque up properly to the specified 98Nm, (72lb), you'll be absolutely fine. Don't fret about it.

It's great that you're prepared to have a go yourself :062:

As for "Del says...", the best advice I can give you here is: if you must watch his comedy videos, then turn the sound off, and ask on the forum. It's a mine of information frequented by seasoned spanner monkeys :oldie: who'll help you all the way. Ignore the likes of Delbollix, the real experts are on here.
:730:
« Last Edit: 03 August, 2019, 08:47:26 PM by Shed »

Offline Shed

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #14 on: 03 August, 2019, 08:33:31 PM »
*Originally Posted by raYzerman [+]
LOL, there's another guy whose videos I can't watch on another forum, thinks he's a mechanic but he's not, mostly just trying to draw attention to himself.  So much misinformation is spread by these types and I think it dangerous that the novices adopt some of this crap as gospel.  If you grew up wrenching stuff that's one thing, but if you're just learning, best stick to the proper service manuals, and if not clear, then ask away right here.

 :0461:

Too many self-appointed narcissistic 'heroes' who clearly think they are God's gift. Tossers.

Offline Crispy

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #15 on: 03 August, 2019, 08:50:50 PM »
Hi raYzorman, it does look fairly obvious but there are potential problems if it’s not fitted properly. One of the skills of a good mechanic is not creating extra jobs for yourself. As Shed points out, incorrect use of tools can cause a whole new problem, a classic is rounding a bolt with rash use of your tools. I’ve done it and that little ******* ruined my weekend.

As for the spacer, the mechanic who written the manual, myself and Del were able to move the spacer slightly to expose the inner race of the bearing. A tight fit could damage the spacer (heat expansion, wear etc), which would/could lead to wear on the bearings, meaning I’d have to do the job again, with extra cost and having my bike off road. There’s also the possibility of the spacer not being correctly aligned so I can’t get the axle back through. And also how would I be able to extract the bearings if they’re a tight fit?



A day without learning is a day wasted

Offline Art

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #16 on: 04 August, 2019, 09:55:18 AM »
Have you re-fitted that rear wheel yet?

Offline Crispy

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #17 on: 04 August, 2019, 11:01:26 AM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
Have you re-fitted that rear wheel yet?

Hi Art, yes the wheel has been refitted. I also cleaned the brake caliper whilst it was off - then greased it - silicone on rubbers and sliders, copper on pads and pin, bit of red rubber grease on the pistons.

A day without learning is a day wasted

Offline Art

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #18 on: 04 August, 2019, 11:03:28 PM »
Just get out and ride now

Offline Crispy

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing Spacer
« Reply #19 on: 05 August, 2019, 09:58:02 PM »
I suppose the use of the word “gap” was the wrong terminology in mechanical engineering terms, but without doubt a few thou of an inch “gap” between the spacer and the bearings would indeed, to my limited knowledge of mechanical engineering, be a gap. It wouldn’t move otherwise.

Pardon my pedantry, but I love MotoGP.

Thanks for the input guys, nice to have a discussion with you.



A day without learning is a day wasted

 


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