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Offline NJD

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Re: Biffa too small
« Reply #10 on: 16 July, 2019, 11:35:27 PM »
If we're talking MK1 then you've got an inch on me in height --  :015: :016: -- but same leg, and it suits me fine. Saying that, however, I haven't done a really long blast yet.

Only suffering I've done so far is some cramp in the left leg, but fine apart from that.

You'll be glad being tall when you press the rear brake too hard and the linked brakes come into effect and catch you out: foot down and save the bike. I've done it a couple of times so far.

Just remember you've got to remove the rear wheel to get the rear brake caliper off and you'll be fine (stupid design). If your looking for something mechanically simple to work on then I'd look elsewhere.

Offline iNCORRIGIBLE

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Re: Biffa too small
« Reply #11 on: 17 July, 2019, 09:22:06 AM »
Hi NJD.Are you sure about having to remove the rear wheel to remove the rear caliper please?  I am just about to do mine.Thanks.Ed. :020:

Offline Art

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Re: Biffa too small
« Reply #12 on: 17 July, 2019, 01:59:56 PM »
You're going to do what?

Removing the rear caliper requires the rear wheel to be removed, however, you can replace the disc pads and clean the calliper pistons without removing the caliper or the wheel.

Why would you want to remove the rear caliper?
« Last Edit: 17 July, 2019, 02:03:55 PM by Art »

Offline NJD

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Re: Biffa too small
« Reply #13 on: 17 July, 2019, 03:32:54 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
Why would you want to remove the rear caliper?

In order to grease the caliper slider pins; in order to inspect piston dust seal condition; in order to pump pistons out and clean below the surface that sticks out to ensure they're free flowing; in order to clean the pad retaining pin and caliper itself, and the pad anti rattle spring.

Indeed you could be lazy and spray brake cleaner with pads removed and caliper in situ but you'd be missing half the job and have no idea what condition everything was in.

Honda should have designed it with the caliper mounted to the bracket and a slider bracket into the caliper.

*Originally Posted by iNCORRIGIBLE [+]
Hi NJD.Are you sure about having to remove the rear wheel to remove the rear caliper please?  I am just about to do mine.Thanks.Ed. :020:

Yes.

Honda manual says remove Banjo bolt and bleed brake system etc but you can leave the lines attached, but makes it harder.

1) Remove ABS sensor mounting bolts, and ABS sensor
2) Loosen and remove axle nut, washer and plate
3) Loosen chain adjusters and give chain free play so can be removed from sprocket later on
4) Slide (or rubber mallet) the axle through the bike
5) remove L/H bracket from swingarm (the plate that sits on L/H)
6) Remove chain adjusters noting positioning and side faces
7) Remove wheel and slide chain to the L/H side of bike over swingarm
8) Remove caliper form swingarm bracket and clean as required.

14 mm offset ring spanner (halfords have a set of them in their modular tray system) works a treat to remove caliper mounting bolt in place on the bike.

8 mm socket for most the bolts around the caliper including pad retaining pin (losen with caliper still mounted to the bike).

If you've not got a comprehensive tool kit, a day spare or an inside space (in the event weather changes) then I'd just take it to a local shop and save the hassle, but remember: no one will look after your bike like you will (mechanics will only do the basics of what you tell them needs doing and not inspect anything else).

Get the sense the caliper is well built and should only be removed maybe once or twice a year for a rebuild hence why is so hard to clean (time will tell).

Offline Art

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Re: Biffa too small
« Reply #14 on: 17 July, 2019, 04:33:21 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
Why would you want to remove the rear caliper?

*Originally Posted by NJD [+]
In order to grease the caliper slider pins; in order to inspect piston dust seal condition; in order to pump pistons out and clean below the surface that sticks out to ensure they're free flowing; in order to clean the pad retaining pin and caliper itself, and the pad anti rattle spring...

I do all that when replacing the rear pads and I do it with the caliper and wheel in situ, it helps to have the facility of a motorcycle lift. Although its a fair point you make, if you're working at ground level the job can be a real pain. I also do it all and then some in conjunction with a rear tyre change which does make the job a little easier but no more thorough.

My point remains don't remove the rear wheel unless you have to or are struggling at ground level.


Offline Piper

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Re: Biffa too small
« Reply #15 on: 17 July, 2019, 07:11:27 PM »
I do it all at ground level with no problem (just a old bit of carpet on the floor to ease the pressure on the old Knees). Do you really remove the pistons twice a year ?? You must do a very high mileage.

 


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