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Offline pedro

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #10 on: 15 April, 2019, 02:19:58 PM »
hairymonster: I get where you are coming from with the "ordinary and sensible" thing. The most amount of criticism Hondas in general get is that they are bland. Which is often a bit unwarranted. Their power characteristics and smooth clutches and gearboxes make riding easy (even the supersports bikes compared with others) and they have a reputation for reliability, which all translates into blandness or not having character by jaded bike journalists who would rather thrill themselves on something like a Laverda Jota (for the uninitiated, a '70's bike that went like stink, usually into hedges) to liven up their day job.

You might like the fully faired version a bit better looks-wise. A Mk1 GT model has this, along with panniers and top box, which of course you don't have to have on except when you need them. But, yes, I think that you've got to get a bike that you can look at and admire and at the end of the day, a CBF1000 will either do that or not for you.
« Last Edit: 15 April, 2019, 02:22:01 PM by pedro »

Offline hairymonster

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #11 on: 15 April, 2019, 05:16:46 PM »
The CB13 I had was the 'S' model with the white and red fairing, which reminded me of the old CB1100R Honda did in the 80s. That used to do it for me at garage opening time.

Being some 56 years old, I remember the Jota well, and always lusted after one, or I thought I did. The newer RGS1000 with the fairing and fuel filler flap at the front was gorgeous.

I also lusted after a Guzzi Le Mans 850, until I rode one. Incredibly uncomfortable, a throttle and clutch which needed wrists of iron to operate, a gear lever (on a new demo bike) which felt like it was connected to a washing up bowl full of loose gear wheels, instruments whose needles oscillated wildly back and forth, idiot lights which were invisible. It went nicely though.

Must say I like the biffa in red or blue with the full fairing.

Does the full fairing make much of a difference to weather protection or is it more for cosmetic purposes?

Cheers - phil

Offline pedro

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #12 on: 15 April, 2019, 06:56:00 PM »
Hard for me to say, I haven't ridden one in the rain with no fairing bottoms on. But the fully faired version is as good as anything at weather protection apart from the barn door type fairings. The main concern would only be the flow of air up-a-ways, the buffeting I mentioned.

Offline hairymonster

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #13 on: 15 April, 2019, 09:19:11 PM »
There are some high-mileage models knocking around on the used market, 60k+

Is there anything to be concerned about for that sort of mileage, beyond the usuals of suspension, bearings etc.

When is the 'big' service due, i.e. valve checks, possible camchain replacement?

How long do the clutches normally last? I ask this because the BMW R1100/R1150s do about 25-30k per clutch, the replacement of which involves a 4-figure spend at an independent.

Please excuse all the questions, but I do tend to go into detail once I'm considering something seriously.

Cheers - phil

Offline phild

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #14 on: 16 April, 2019, 09:08:29 AM »
I wonít ask your budget, but there are plenty of low mileage examples, of both MK1 and 2, to pick from.

Iíve got a MK2. Iíve had it from new (December 2012) and canít find any good reason to change it.

Although we donít do high mileages in UK, ever May we (my wife on her 2012 CBF600SA) go touring in Europe, covering 2000 plus each tour. Italy X2, Spain X3, going for the 4th time this May. Great bike and does everything I ask of it.

 :028:

Offline Leofric

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #15 on: 16 April, 2019, 08:13:43 PM »
It doesn't make any difference to me (I am not on commission !  :002:) but my old 2012 CBF1000FA MK2 must be coming up for sale at Miles Kingsport, Hull ,shortly if you are interested. A good bike well looked after, 17,000 miles which isn't much for that engine.

Offline Almekinders

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #16 on: 18 April, 2019, 08:16:34 PM »
I've got a MK2 with over 80,000 miles on it and haven't encountered any problem. Mileage isn't much of an issue I would say. Regular maintenance of course is essential. In my opinion it is one of the most useful bikes money can buy although not the most exciting. I always think of it as a Toyota on two wheels, hardly exciting but ever so practical.

Offline Scott_rider

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Re: Considering a biffa
« Reply #17 on: 19 April, 2019, 02:02:48 PM »
My two-penneth on the Biffa, having covered 8000 miles on my Mark 1 in about a year. My previous bikes were a Yamaha Fazer 1000, Triumph Speed Triple 1050, Honda CBR900RR FireBlade, Suzuki GSX-R750, Honda VFR750 amongst others...so that's what I compare it with...

Brakes - the linked system takes a bit of getting used to as the front brake on it's own isn't great but once you get used to always using the rear brake as well then the brakes are fine.

Size - it's a relatively small bike so a bit of playing around with the seat height and bar position is worthwhile to get a good fit.

Suspension - pretty good but not up to sportbike's standards...but it's not a sportsbike.

Engine - a peach of an engine, absolute peach. Loads of grunt right from tickover. Super smooth. Ideal for road riding. Not much top end, but you don't need it because of the low down grunt.

Fuelling - perfect fuelling

Screen - not good. Even my replacement MRA screen isn't that great.

Stator - mine failed in Austria. I've written about it on here. It's a weak spot on the Mark 1.

Tyres - rides and feels differently on different tyres. I'm on my third set. The first ones were Bridgestones and I changed them straightaway as they had a dead feel. I'm now on Pirellis which are superb.

Exhausts - runs much, much better with the standard exhausts.

Wonky bars - a lot of Mark 1's have wonky bars. There is a misalignment somewhere between the top and bottom yokes and the fork legs and the front fairing. I had mine set up on a laser rig. Still not perfect. But you get used to it.

In summary, my Biffa is way faster than my old Fazer 1000 up to 100mph but the Fazer 1000 would be faster after that. I reckon it's just about the same performance as my old 1050 Speed Triple, quicker than a VFR750, a lot slower than a FireBlade, and much more comfortable than a GSX-R.

There is something about the Biffa that is just 'right' if that makes sense  :018:



« Last Edit: 19 April, 2019, 02:04:54 PM by Scott_rider »

 


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