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Offline john 087

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #10 on: 01 April, 2019, 10:05:10 PM »
I have a mk2 and had the same problem. There was play in the back wheel bearing

Offline iNCORRIGIBLE

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #11 on: 01 April, 2019, 10:40:32 PM »
Thanks,John.Have checked rear bearings & foun
d no perceptible movement. Ed.

Offline Scott_rider

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #12 on: 02 April, 2019, 07:15:15 AM »
Might be a loose headstock? Check the tightness of the nut on the top yoke, underneath the handlebars. You can just about get a spanner on it without taking the bars off. If it’s loose, you’ll feel it straightaway, and if so it will cause a dull clunk when you go over bumps. It should be torqued up to the correct setting.
It’s worth checking, mine was loose.

Offline iNCORRIGIBLE

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #13 on: 02 April, 2019, 07:59:35 PM »
Thanks,Scott.Have checked that area & all OK but I have certainly experienced that on other bikes previously.Ed. :123:

Offline iNCORRIGIBLE

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #14 on: 29 April, 2019, 05:07:56 PM »
Thanks All for your help.As Art suggested it turned out to be one of the three rear wheel bearings failing!.Only found minimal play on inspection but bearing was actually badly degraded when I got into it! Thanks again to All.ED.

Offline Piper

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #15 on: 29 April, 2019, 09:06:13 PM »
*Originally Posted by Art [+]
You can adjust the chain on either the centre stand or the side stand. What's important is that the the front and rear sprockets align with each other and the swinging arm (see drawing) and that chain slack of between 1 and 1.5% of the total chain length (20 to 30mm) is measured at the tightest point.
Its not a good idea to adjust on the centre stand if you are only allowing the minimum of 20mm free play. The distance between the front and rear sprockets will be a little shorter when on the centre stand as the swing arm is lower (Its all due to the location of the swing arm bearing being in-between the sprockets). I adjust mine on the centre stand as it is easy to check for the tightest point ensuring that there is at least 25mm free play then check with the wheels in the same position on the side stand to ensure that there is a minimum of 20mm play. It is always slightly less on the side stand. 

My MOT tester gets me to sit on the bike to try and get the 2 sprocket and swing arm centers to line up as much as possible so the chain is at its maximum stretch then he checks that the chain is not over tight. Obviously it doesn't require the same amount of slack in that position.   
« Last Edit: 29 April, 2019, 09:08:04 PM by Piper »

Offline alfau

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #16 on: 30 April, 2019, 09:34:05 AM »
Time for me to say hello.
I joined a few days ago motivated by a new to me 2008 cbfa 1000. 49 thousand kilometres on the clock.
Interesting topic "Klunk"
What is scary is the many options as to what it might have been.
Needless to say I have been tracking a klunk of my own which eventually turned out to be the top mounting bolt for the rear shock.
It was quite loose. klunky loose. With the bike on the centre stand I levered the swingarm up and down from under the tyre with a tyre leaver and a block of wood.  it tightened up ok just waiting for  rain to stop.
I found my weak centre stand spring, interesting but wrong noise.

Online Art

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Re: A "KLUNK"
« Reply #17 on: 30 April, 2019, 11:13:48 AM »
*Originally Posted by Piper [+]
Its not a good idea to adjust on the centre stand if you are only allowing the minimum of 20mm free play. The distance between the front and rear sprockets will be a little shorter when on the centre stand as the swing arm is lower (Its all due to the location of the swing arm bearing being in-between the sprockets). I adjust mine on the centre stand as it is easy to check for the tightest point ensuring that there is at least 25mm free play then check with the wheels in the same position on the side stand to ensure that there is a minimum of 20mm play. It is always slightly less on the side stand. 

My MOT tester gets me to sit on the bike to try and get the 2 sprocket and swing arm centers to line up as much as possible so the chain is at its maximum stretch then he checks that the chain is not over tight. Obviously it doesn't require the same amount of slack in that position.

Seems to me we're saying the same thing there. The method I describe above is how I was taught during my apprenticeship. Note too the correct amount of chain slack is determined by the length of the chain length and is calculated as 1 to 1.5% of the total chain length. On a stock CBF1000 that is exactly 1" +/- ⅜" (motorcycle chains remain imperial) or roughly 25mm if you prefer.
« Last Edit: 30 April, 2019, 11:15:00 AM by Art »

 


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