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Offline Scott_rider

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Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« on: 25 June, 2018, 03:31:15 PM »
Hi Guys. Unfortunately, 8 days into an 11 day European trip my Biffer broke down in Austria and it's still there  :003:. I'm back in the UK via taxis, hire cars, and a boat. I'd be grateful for any advice on the following:

1). The battery went flat at a petrol sation during a hot, fast day's riding. We bumped the bike, it started, then it died again 30 mins later at a junction in Insbruck. The breakdown recovery driver tested the battery and said it wasn't receiving a charge. Hence, we thought the Stator had packed up  :003:.

Is this likely or could it just be the rectifier? All fuses are good.

2). The Insurance company agreed to repatriate the bike as it would take too long to fix it in Austria. It will be back in 14 days time. However, they had to take it from the breakdown compound to an authorised Honda dealer 50 km away for official diagnosis before starting the repatriation process. That dealer has charged 250 euros for the diagnosis which I have to pay for, but I only found out about it when I was back in the UK :003:.

Is that the usual procedure?
 
3). Lastly, that diagnosis seems a lot of money to me and the outcome is vague because of the language difference. It translates, apparently, as 'faulty alternator'  :006:. The bike is now back from the dealer at the original breakdown compound (and all within 4 hours, which seems a bit quick)?

Any advice or comments greatly appreciated. Thanks.
« Last Edit: 25 June, 2018, 04:08:50 PM by Scott_rider »

Offline alan sh

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #1 on: 25 June, 2018, 04:24:01 PM »
I don't know what will happen to it, but I would guess the alternator has gone - not the rectifier.

Alan
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Offline Scott_rider

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #2 on: 25 June, 2018, 04:38:14 PM »
Is the Alternator the same component as the Stator?

Offline alan sh

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #3 on: 25 June, 2018, 05:00:25 PM »
Yes it is.
Red MK II with full luggage, MRA screen, hugger, crash bungs, heated grips and Autocom.
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Offline Brickit

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #4 on: 25 June, 2018, 05:44:11 PM »
It sounds like you have had a pretty rough time of it. It could be more than just the stator, as replacing that alone shouldn't be a big job for a Honda dealer.
My stator packed up in Santander. Fortunately I bought and carried a spare. Symptoms were similar to those you describe, but I did get nearly 50 miles warning that something bad was about to happen, after the voltage charge indicator light turned red.
The biffer is a great bike, very reliable, except for that one item, which is definitely it's achilles heel. I reckon if you are going on tour with a mk 1, the spare stator should be the first thing to go in the tool box. Then, as long as you have an 8mm ring spanner, (which I forgot), its just a roadside repair.

Offline hondacbf

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #5 on: 25 June, 2018, 06:19:46 PM »
250 euros for a diagnosis  :005:

Offline TerryR

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #6 on: 26 June, 2018, 06:54:28 AM »
1) It's 99% probable that it's the stator. The CBF is known for it and it's definitely the weak link in an otherwise excellent bike.
2) An alternator has 2 main components - the rotor which is the bit that rotates and the stator which is the bit that stands still. On the CBF, the rotor is just a big magnet and the stator is made up of coils of wire. There is almost nothing that can go wrong with a big magnet but the wire coils can break or burn out.
3) A faulty alternator is easy to diagnose using a voltage meter to measure the output. The 4 hours translates to 10 minutes of diagnosis and 3:50 of butt scratching.
4) 250 Euros for this is seriously taking the piss.
5) That's why you have recovery insurance, send the bill to the insurance company and let them worry about it.

Offline Scott_rider

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #7 on: 26 June, 2018, 02:02:17 PM »
It's the Insurance Company who are telling me that I've got to pay the 250 euro diagnosis fee...they say it's in the policy document that the diagnosis fee is payable by the owner PRIOR to them agreeing to repatriate the bike... :087:

Offline TerryR

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #8 on: 26 June, 2018, 02:18:27 PM »
If it's in the policy, I doubt there's much you can do about it. In the meantime, your bike is sitting in a yard somewhere and I seriously doubt they are looking after it the way you would. If it was my bike and I was in your situation, I would pay up and get my bike back ASAP. I wouldn't be real happy about it but that's what I would do.

You can save some of that 250 Euros by replacing the stator yourself. It's not a difficult job and there's lots of threads on here about how to do it. You can also use an after-market stator which will be much cheaper than the Honda variety. Also, I think Honda extended the warranty on stators in the UK so you might want to ask your local dealer if your bike is covered.

Offline mikeratters

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Re: Biffer broken down in Austria - advice please?
« Reply #9 on: 26 June, 2018, 08:51:51 PM »
I had a slightly different experience. I recently decided to do the NC500 around Scotlands coast. Given the large number of stator failures I'd read about, I thought I'd do some preventative maintenance and replace the stator before I went on the trip. My 2008 has done just over 20,000 miles and i bought it at 9,000 two years ago but wasn't sure if the stator had been done. As others have said the actual change is pretty straightforward ( although I seem to have to loosen the pannier rack to get the side fairing off _ i'm sure there must be an easier way ).
Day 1 I rode up from St.Helens to Largs , about 270 miles and bike ran fine with no problems.
Day 2 Battery completely flat at the hotel. I was travelling alone but some really helpful guys helped find me a garage who ordered a new original Yuasa battery. Battery fitted all looked good and off I went. I did check the voltage across the battery and appeared to be getting 14 v.
Days 3,4  rode round the magnificent NC500 - I highly recommend it.
Day 5  was a rainy day and after lunch  heated grips started flashing . To be fair it was raining so thought I'd got water in the electrics. Only when I'd arrived at the hotel and checked this excellent forum, did I discover this was an indication of too little charge to run the heated grips. Suffice to say battery was flat again.
Ended up having to be recovered home, as although it started with a bump it was only getting 11 volts. Didn't fancy being stuck again so final day was a bit of a let down.
Once home I stripped the stator to see it had burnt a coil out - by my reckoning it lasted about 300 miles.
I spoke to the supplier who said it was inconclusive from the picture what the problem was. They did eventually refund the cost of the stator but with no explanation ( or even paying the return postage). The supplier was electrexworld, who others have a good experience with - I didn't and their attitude was terrible. I'm now on the lookout for a different supplier of stator.
Having changed stator twice  I can confirm the change is pretty straightforward. The original part back on and has just done a 3 day thousand mile trip.

Good luck repatriating your bike back

 


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