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Offline Silverdart

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #10 on: 12 June, 2018, 04:43:40 PM »
After suffering for years with the manufacturer's screen, I went to the MRA touring windshield "T" (the one with the two holes) for my 2009 Biffer last summer.

The difference is as night is to day and I should have done it sooner.

I don't seem to have a heat issue with the engine though. Perhaps that's because I always wear protective trousers though and just can't feel it through the armoured pants.
Old enough to have seen it all, heard it all, done it all. Just can't remember it all.

Offline KiwiBob

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #11 on: 13 June, 2018, 01:22:05 PM »
Just as an comparison Silverdart, how tall are you and which seat height setting do you use?

bob

Offline KiwiBob

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #12 on: 13 June, 2018, 01:29:29 PM »
*Originally Posted by alan sh [+]
The genuine MRA screen has two holes in the screen and the lip. I think both are needed. The holes allow air under the screen which then counteracts the swirling you get as air comes over the screen (due to the partial vacuum caused because of the air flow). The lip adjusts the overall airflow away from your head/helmet.

If you just fit a lip to a standard screen, it won't work as well.

Alan

Hi Alan, I think you have described the problem pretty accurately. I was thinking of making some spacers to fit between the standard screen and the fairing to allow more airflow behind the screen. Easy to make and fit and wont cost anything. I thought it might be worth a try at least. Otherwise the MRA touring screen with lip is probably be the one to go for.

Bob

Offline Silverdart

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #13 on: 13 June, 2018, 05:59:43 PM »
*Originally Posted by KiwiBob [+]
Just as an comparison Silverdart, how tall are you and which seat height setting do you use?

bob

I'm just under 6'. Haven't made any adjustments to the seat height; it is as it came new from the factory.
Old enough to have seen it all, heard it all, done it all. Just can't remember it all.

Offline Mat75

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #14 on: 14 June, 2018, 03:45:33 PM »
Just picked up my 2012 CBF 2 weeks ago. First thing I didnít love was the screen. After reading a few things I bought the MRA Vario Screen. I found it still to be pretty useless. Im 6í3 so I know Iím going to struggle as I have with every other bike Iíve owned. Iím going to order the brackets from Palmer which will hopefully eliminate the problem. I wear plugs and I still find it horrendous..
My only other issue is vibes over 5k and the weird Top Box wobble.. Iíll be booking it in to hopefully get it sorted and fit some new rubber. Iíd love anyoneís feedback on both issues. Apart from that, I find it to be a great bike and very comfortable.

Offline Vlady

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #15 on: 14 June, 2018, 06:04:30 PM »
*Originally Posted by Mat75 [+]
Just picked up my 2012 CBF 2 weeks ago. First thing I didnít love was the screen. After reading a few things I bought the MRA Vario Screen. I found it still to be pretty useless. Im 6í3 so I know Iím going to struggle as I have with every other bike Iíve owned. Iím going to order the brackets from Palmer which will hopefully eliminate the problem. I wear plugs and I still find it horrendous..
My only other issue is vibes over 5k and the weird Top Box wobble.. Iíll be booking it in to hopefully get it sorted and fit some new rubber. Iíd love anyoneís feedback on both issues. Apart from that, I find it to be a great bike and very comfortable.
I thought this is CBF1000 issue - vibes above 5000rpm! I have the same problem, gladly you do not need to rev it hard to progress quickly. :)

Offline Mat75

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #16 on: 14 June, 2018, 07:05:14 PM »
Some people have it and others donít have any issue or have used various things to reduce the vibes. Mine is particularly bad over 5k..

Offline Biker Mike

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #17 on: 15 June, 2018, 06:40:03 AM »
You could write books on the topic of screen issues on the CBF posted on this forum.
I should know, I think one of mine holds the record here.
Suffice to say, you can either fix the turbulence problem by fitting spacers or by changing to another screen.
I toyed with the idea of spacers but because the mountings are angled outward, most spacer resolutions require either bigger mounting holes in the screen or new holes and I wasn't prepared to go this route.
Personally, I've tried 5 different screens from the cheapest to the most expensive and the best I've found is the Ermax fliptop.
It won't cure airflow noise, but it will cure turbulence (it's good to have an airflow, especially if you want to stay cool when riding in hot weather).
If you fork out for a CalSci screen, you can buy models big enough to sit behind in an almost eerie silence, but the downside is that if you happen to drop the bike, you're more than likely going to crack your screen as well as they're rather wide and they block the airflow too effectively.
As for noise, the best solution for noise reduction is a well fitting helmet with an effective chin curtain.
If you look at a bunch of lids next time you're in a gear shop or around a bunch of bikers, you'll see there's a wide range of designs, some useless with virtually no curtain (like the Shark Evoline 3) and others very effective and a deep curtain (like the Schuberth C3) and it isn't down to cost, just design.
Don't ignore this important aspect of helmet design. Any airflow coming up from beneath into the lid will cause noise. Interestingly, a lot of this air originates from air forced up through the headstock area (put your hand across the top of this area as you ride at speed and you'll see what I mean. Similarly, put a bit the back of your hand under your chin to block airflow into your lid and note the effect).
You could try a WindJammer, but they're rather uncomfortable. Alternatively, use a balaclava or maybe a snood.
Best of luck.
« Last Edit: 15 June, 2018, 06:45:46 AM by Biker Mike »

Offline KiwiBob

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Re: Three weeks with the Biffer
« Reply #18 on: 16 June, 2018, 12:57:47 PM »
Hi Biker Mike, thanks for sharing your experiences. It saves myself and others having to go through the same expensive process.
You make a good point about the mounting screws for the screen, Iíll have to rethink that idea.
Bob

 


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