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Offline Rev Ken

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #20 on: 22 June, 2018, 07:31:52 PM »
*Originally Posted by Beans [+]
The turntable itself is very well made and on the single occasion I was able to use it as intended I was indeed delighted. Centre stands are new to me so I don't have more than two weeks experience in total. I can usually get the biffer on the centre stand in favourable conditions, and hard work! but only once with the turntable beneath. I'm no physicist but the difference I suspect is that I have different angles with my levers, relatively small but significant. Especially seeing the bike in general maybe isn't the easiest to do?
Certainly don't apologise.

I agree with you, the ride height is critical making it very hard to get on the centre stand with even a small decrease in ride height. I just rolled my CBF's rear wheel on to a bit of old chipboard about 3/4" thick and then it was easy. Without it I couldn't get it on the centre stand - neither could some of my friends who endeavoured to 'show me how to do it'....... :007: There is a knack, but that only works when the ride height allows it.

Edit.... Have you thought of just putting your side stand down and swiveling your bike around on that? The side stand will take it. I've only done it when really stuck but it worked for me.
« Last Edit: 22 June, 2018, 07:35:58 PM by Rev Ken »
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Offline Beans

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #21 on: 22 June, 2018, 10:36:29 PM »
I cringe, rev ken, when its on the side stand. It seems like an awful lot of bike propped up by one bit of steel. I certainly couldn't bring myself to be swinging the bike around on it.  :005:

Offline Ianrobbo1

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #22 on: 23 June, 2018, 06:07:14 AM »
*Originally Posted by Beans [+]
I cringe, rev ken, when its on the side stand. It seems like an awful lot of bike propped up by one bit of steel. I certainly couldn't bring myself to be swinging the bike around on it.  :005:

I do this a fair bit with the bird and biffer, it comes to no harm,they strap bikes down on ferries using the side stand, occasionally messing up :164:
A newbie to the Biffer, owned a Bird for 17 years, and looking forward to long term ownership of my CBF!!

Offline pedro

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #23 on: 23 June, 2018, 08:45:07 PM »
The side stand swivel works pretty well. The trick is confidence and a bit of practice. Don't try to do a full 180 degrees in one go. Just turn it as far as you are comfortable and then put it down and reposition yourself, then repeat until the beast is pointing where you want.

Offline Stearn

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #24 on: 24 June, 2018, 09:53:15 PM »
I work at a bike shop and couldn't agree more. The side stand swivel is a really useful way of moving bikes around that I, and many of my colleagues, use frequently, and daily, to great effect.

I ride a biffer and it is, without doubt, one of the best balanced and easiest bikes there is to do this with, so should be great to learn with.

So here's the skinny, as they say.

Stand in the middle of the bike, with the bike on it's side stand, as if you were about to get on. Pull the left handle bar with your left hand to the stop, put your right hand on the far right of the grab (kind of diagonally opposite your left). Pull the left and right hand toward you such that you lift the bike onto the side stand. Now use your left to guide the bike round as you continue to balance the bike, with your right hand, on it's side stand. Be brave, you wont drop it.

It takes some practise, like anything, but can be mastered relatively quickly, and is really useful - good luck. Next time, if enough ask, how to actually get your knee down.

Offline Beans

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #25 on: 26 June, 2018, 06:42:00 PM »
I would love to know how to get my knee down @stearn.

Anyhow swiveling on the side stand can wait, these guys on here are right. A piece of board under the back tyre, bike on side stand, turntable under, bike easily up on centre stand, turn bike, rock off ready for the next day pointing in the right direction.

Sorted

Offline Stearn

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Re: Ride in, reverse out?
« Reply #26 on: 26 June, 2018, 09:23:45 PM »
Just to be clear doing the side stand swivel thingy does no damage to the bike. Some of the bikes we use in the training school/shop, that I work at, have had this happen to them hundreds of times!

To get your knee down - I can help with this but it is quite complex. You'll need good quality tyres, sorry about the lengthy answer.

First, stand on the right foot peg such that your right foot big toe and next toe are 'holding' the foot pegs the rest of you foot being off the foot peg. On the other side your left foot should be against the frame whilst you stand on tip toes on both sides. This will give you extra distance you'll need.

Next you'll need a constant radius, right hand, corner without traffic, like a roundabout. Go round and round this right hand constant radius in second gear. Hang off the bike with your bottom half stuck out such that your left buttock is the only part of your bottom on the seat whilst your right knee is pushed outwards. Your top half should then go back across the front of your bike such that your head is as close to being over the front forks as you can, this helps you get the bike over further.

Now increase the bikes speed, provided I have explained this properly this should produce a knee down.

If not then the other option is one - to - one lessons. As I am a qualified instructor so this could be arranged if required.

Hope this helps......     

 


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