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Offline chubbleybear

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Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« on: 08 May, 2018, 08:32:51 PM »
Firstly, please pardon my ignorance but the last time I fitted an aftermarket pipe (a Blue Flame, I think it was) it was before the days of catalytic converters.

I have been looking at a used Kawasaki Versys 1000 (Sacrilege!, I hear you cry  :005: ) which has an Akrawotnot fitted. I will ask the dealer these questions, but I would appreciate an honest and unbiased opinion from elsewhere first...

1. Does the can have to bear a stamp saying that it's road legal?
2. The cat will probably have been in the OEM can. I don't know if this would come with the bike. So would the bike pass emissions testing and /or noise testing if it's road legal?
3. Will the fuelling have had to be altered? If so, what happens if I have to take it for an MOT with the (or 'a') OEM exhaust.

Bit of a can of worms really (pardon the pun).  :084:

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Offline Ali-bear

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #1 on: 09 May, 2018, 07:16:32 AM »
Are you concerned about the MOT test? There is no emissions testing for bikes in the test. If the tester is being fussy he could fail a bike for having an excessively noisy exhaust but in my limited experience with reasonably noisy ones they don't bother. Does the Akro have a removable baffle? Remember you can always sell it on and put something else on there.
Catalytic converters are found further up the pipe normally (although the biffer is an exception to this) where they can operate hotter and are harder to remove or tamper with. But not sure about your Versys - maybe check on their forums?
With regard to fuelling. Generally I think the more performance-oriented the engine is, the more its fuelling will be effected by changes in the exhaust. You usually can't get much more power out of a modern engine just by slapping on a different end can. But change the cam timing and its a different story, you need a power commander and full dyno setup just to make the thing run properly. So basically unless you can get a significant performance boost from it, you are unlikely to need to modify the fuelling.
And if the fuelling was modified, putting the original can back on temporarily just for the MOT test will do no harm at all.
Make sense?
« Last Edit: 09 May, 2018, 07:18:21 AM by Ali-bear »
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Offline shumba

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #2 on: 09 May, 2018, 08:42:18 AM »
 Why change from a standard exhaust that has been tried and tested by the bike makers for best all round performance , and that is suited to the engine for optimum valve life, Bike owners do not have any facilities for testing anything ,let alone complex exhaust systems, Its a well known fact in the bike trade that an unmolested standard bike will almost always get a better trade in price , The  premise is that if owners have been messing with exhaust systems that they know nothing about ,then what else
have they been messing with.

Offline Ali-bear

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #3 on: 09 May, 2018, 03:22:31 PM »
It's a bit of a traditional thing that guys just do to their bikes  :027:
Aftermarket items can improve the look and sound of a bike and that is important. Also there can be (as in the case of the biffer) a significant weight saving.
But these days there is often very little if anything to be gained in terms of performance.
I am currently settling into ownership of a Triumph Street Triple 765 and the forums often see threads such as "I fitted an AkraProjectArrowSupertnutterturboba****dCarbon end can to my bike and now the low-speed fuelling is all messed up but the bike isn't any faster". I don't know really what they were realistically expecting to gain?
Partly the bike press is to blame. They get bikes on loan and endless bolt-on shiny bits given to them to try out, all as a way of promoting those things for the manufacturers, importers and merchants. Monkey see monkey do.
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Offline shumba

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #4 on: 09 May, 2018, 03:41:08 PM »
*Originally Posted by Ali-bear [+]
It's a bit of a traditional thing that guys just do to their bikes  :027:
Aftermarket items can improve the look and sound of a bike and that is important. Also there can be (as in the case of the biffer) a significant weight saving.
But these days there is often very little if anything to be gained in terms of performance.
I am currently settling into ownership of a Triumph Street Triple 765 and the forums often see threads such as "I fitted an AkraProjectArrowSupertnutterturboba****dCarbon end can to my bike and now the low-speed fuelling is all messed up but the bike isn't any faster". I don't know really what they were realistically expecting to gain?
Partly the bike press is to blame. They get bikes on loan and endless bolt-on shiny bits given to them to try out, all as a way of promoting those things for the manufacturers, importers and merchants. Monkey see monkey do.


 All of that is very true ,its up to the bike owner to do as they wish with their bikes,after all the bike does belong to them , At the same time it makes very little sense to alter parts that that are critical to the well being and longevity of the bike, and at the same time reduce its value, And also risk an insurance claim rejection .I am not talking about replacing items that are known to be low grade such as alternators or tyres.

Offline Ali-bear

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #5 on: 09 May, 2018, 04:13:36 PM »
Agreed.
I do believe unmolested examples are worth more. At the extreme end of this you have the old classics that folk spend a fortune on just restoring to the original condition.
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Offline chubbleybear

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #6 on: 09 May, 2018, 05:20:16 PM »
You both raise some very good points,

So...

What about the barmy situation where a manufacturer offers an 'aftermarket' exhaust that can be fitted as an optional accessory to a brand new bike for sale from that manufacturer's own dealership network? Barking or wot?  :125: It's a sort of customised bike but not as we know it, Jim.
« Last Edit: 09 May, 2018, 05:22:23 PM by chubbleybear »
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Offline Ali-bear

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #7 on: 10 May, 2018, 08:32:24 AM »
Not so barking when that aftermarket can retails at £600. Yes that's £600 for a bit of sheet metal that's been cut, folded and welded.
Like car manuf's I think they make good profits out of the options and accessories.
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Offline Leofric

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Re: Aftermarket exhaust - a general question.
« Reply #8 on: 16 May, 2018, 01:53:07 PM »
I fit Beowulf exhaust to get better sound and reduce weight and also protect original exhaust and catalytic converter from damage in case of a fall over. I always keep original parts to put bike back to bog standard when trading in.
Didn't know aftermarket exhausts which are road legal with baffles affected valve life.