Author Topic: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?  (Read 5997 times)

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#10

Offline Ali-bear

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #10 on: 09 May, 2017, 10:34:19 AM
*Originally Posted by shumba [+]
  I have heard about several BMW models having heavy oil consumption . I dont know if this has anything to do with reliability or if they are just made to operate that way.

That's a perfect example. The early hexhead twins (2004-2006 of which the original R1200GS was an example) had a poor piston ring design. So they used a lot of oil. BMW fixed this in the later models but that just illustrates how they are happy to release under-developed bikes on the market.

Other issues plaguing the same line: Weak rear final drive bearings that dry up, overheat or just wear out fast. Weak ignition lock induction loops (exactly like the Honda HISS system) that left a lot of riders stranded by the immobilizer. Fuel pump controllers ruined by corrosion caused by water ingress. Cheaply made and short-lived yet expensive ABS units. OE batteries that fail. Dry clutch design that can't be replaced without removing the entire rear half of the bike. My 2007 GS had all of these common faults (except didn't yet need a new clutch).
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#11

Offline shumba

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #11 on: 09 May, 2017, 12:09:40 PM
*Originally Posted by Ali-bear [+]
That's a perfect example. The early hexhead twins (2004-2006 of which the original R1200GS was an example) had a poor piston ring design. So they used a lot of oil. BMW fixed this in the later models but that just illustrates how they are happy to release under-developed bikes on the market.

Other issues plaguing the same line: Weak rear final drive bearings that dry up, overheat or just wear out fast. Weak ignition lock induction loops (exactly like the Honda HISS system) that left a lot of riders stranded by the immobilizer. Fuel pump controllers ruined by corrosion caused by water ingress. Cheaply made and short-lived yet expensive ABS units. OE batteries that fail. Dry clutch design that can't be replaced without removing the entire rear half of the bike. My 2007 GS had all of these common faults (except didn't yet need a new clutch).

 What I find hard to understand is that in spite of all the problems these bikes have had ,  folks are still prepared to put their hard earned cash into them ,and they are still selling in big numbers. 

#12

Offline ivor hugh jarse

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #12 on: 09 May, 2017, 12:28:30 PM
Because on telly they were the first and only bikes to ride around the entire planet - thats apart from thousands who did it before them on BSA Bantams and and even Honda C90 plastics 

I can see the inspiration from the programmes like Long Way Upside Round with Mr McGregor and Mr Boorman riding around the worldÖ but Iím like the young kid whoís not allowed to cross the road so he circles the block of where he lives.
Iím truly like that with tarmac, and Iím happy to ride to the edge of tarmac but riding through deserts and rubble mountains roads and mud in remote parts of the earth seems like a little too much effort for the return that I imagine they would give to me.

I have a friend who likes to take off somewhere challenging and next year its supposed to be Libya where he intends to ride but the recent spat wont allow that now. A couple of years ago he managed to sneak into Russia on the a dirt track road without any permit or visa but riding a modern BMW with English number plates didnít help him to blend in with the local cabbage growers and their old donkey and cart that much. I do like the way he does his rides though, these are either on his own or with his missus but without an escort of 16 bikes and a couple of 4X4s with huge Hollywood catering trucks. It makes me wonder how the Sahara desert is these days since the likes of the Dakar Rally spawned all these adventurers. I imagine the locals wandering the desert with their goats are always dodging adventure bikes and 4X4s and huge trucks as they charge overland in a cloud of dust spewing empty coke bottles and energy bar wrappers.

It reminds me of those programmes on the Discovery Channel with some jungle expert who is truly lost as he talks to the camera and wonders how heís going to make it out alive without starving to death when we all know that his camera crew have set up a mini town over the next hill because we can hear the generator and almost smell the barbecue and beer that they will be having that evening.

Thereís an awful amount of tarmac out there in the world that will challenge me to get close enough to nature as I want to go without getting my tyres in the mud. Iím not a defeatist I just donít get the group off road adventure thing unless its summer green laning half a mile to a pub with traditional beer and a barmaid with a pretty face and ample cleavage

Anyone whoís watched the fabulous TERRA- CIRCA will enjoy Austin Vinceís very practical view of riding around the world

Before Long way Round there was Mondo Enduro Ė seven friends riding the world without support crews, GS Adventures, mobile phones or irritating producers called Russ.

Mondoís Austin Vince on keeping it simple

We spent two years planning our trip but within two months of leaving we realised we could have organised it in two weeks. Because resources like the internet and Chris Scottís Adventure motorcycling handbook didnít exist, we spent ages planning for things that didnít happen, and were never going to happen. My advice is to under-prepare. I donít mean be silly but donít obsess, donít try to predict whatís going to happen on every single day of the trip Ė thatís the point Charley and Ewan missed spectacularly.

Suzukiís DR350 was our bike of choice. Iím really disappointed in the motorcycling community that has so blindly embraced the BMW marketing golden calf, those huge Chelsea tractors. A child can watch Long way Round and tell you theyíre on the wrong bike. The phrase ďless is moreĒ has never been more relevant than it is to adventure motorcycling. If youíre going on a proper adventure, and that means somewhere that isnít Europe, America or Australia, youíll never wish your bike was bigger and heavier than it is, but the GS or KTM Adventure rider will wish his bike was smaller and lighter every single day.

As for luggage, a couple of us went with soft luggage but most of the group had hard luggage, all of which fell to bits eventually. The ideal combination is soft panniers and a small, lockable top box. The choice of luggage now is unbelievable. I favour homemade army surplus stuff because itís cheap and thereís no denying how much fun it is making your own s**t.

Also the specialist equipment, aluminium boxes and the like, make your bike look intimidating and scary, and I feel if youíre going to go amongst people who are conspicuously poorer than you, youíre rubbing their face in it if youíve got £4000-worth of luggage clipped to a £12,000 bike. Itís the two-wheeled equivalent of a Hummer. A £2000 bike with £50 bags scales you back.

Any crappy road atlas will get you from one side of any country to the other, you donít need any specialist maps at all. For Mondo we bought ONC maps, aviation maps designed by the American military that cover every square inch of the planet, the only set of maps that does.

We bought every sheet between Turkey and Magadan and it was a complete waste of time. The rest of the worldís not like England; there arenít tangles of roads everywhere. Out there thereís usually only one road anywhere and if you get lost you just ask someone. You only need GPS if youíre crossing proper, open desert in which normal navigational isnít possible. And then youíre not really on a round-the-word trip, youíre on a rally.

There is no ideal group size, the key thing is team spirit; how well you know each other and to what extent you share a common goal. State the team aim, have a couple of simple rules and itíll be fantastic. Thereís no denying that riding with a bunch of mates in a group with a stupid name is without doubt the most satisfying, warming, exciting and rewarding thing youíll ever do.

For more on Mondo, visit www.mondoenduro.com
Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snake bite..... and furthermore always carry a small snake.   W.C.FIELDS

#13

Offline shumba

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #13 on: 09 May, 2017, 01:20:24 PM
 I agree with all you have said Ivor , Things are slightly different from the early 1960s when the in thing  for teenage boys and girls to do was to ride from the UK to Australia on Vespa or Lambretta scooters without making a song and dance about it .
 How things have changed.

#14

Offline phild

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #14 on: 09 May, 2017, 04:44:33 PM
No.  :001:

#15

Offline pedro

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #15 on: 14 June, 2017, 01:44:33 AM
Well actually, I would have considered buying one, were I going to buy another motorcycle in the near future until I read this thread. I wonder if their misplaced reputation for reliability to those that know no better is piggy-backed off the alleged reliability of BMW cars.

But I don't think I'd buy one anyway for going far off road anyway. not my cup of tea. Although I have a quad bike, but that's just a workhorse. As for buying expensive kit that has a poor reputation for reliability, my car is a Land Rover. 'Nuff said! So, really, my CBF is the most reliable mode of transport available to me.

Another thread about what to replace the CBF with? How about Honda re-introducing an updated CBF1000 - a Mk3? Updated styling, updated engine but the same comfort, effortless power and grunt. Surely there's a hole in their line-up for a litre sports tourer. According to the Honda site, the only sports tourers they have are the VFR800 and the flawed VFR1200.

#16

Offline richardcbf

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #16 on: 14 June, 2017, 06:15:33 AM
*Originally Posted by pedro [+]
....Another thread about what to replace the CBF with? How about Honda re-introducing an updated CBF1000 - a Mk3? Updated styling, updated engine but the same comfort, effortless power and grunt. Surely there's a hole in their line-up for a litre sports tourer. According to the Honda site, the only sports tourers they have are the VFR800 and the flawed VFR1200.
Yeh!  :028:

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ę on: 25 January, 2017, 11:56:05 AM Ľ

https://www.cbf1000.com/index.php/topic,20860.0.html
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#17

Offline Ali-bear

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #17 on: 14 June, 2017, 10:11:10 AM
Maybe they will eventually put out a 1000cc big brother of the CBR650F.
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#18

Offline Robo

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #18 on: 14 June, 2017, 11:27:48 AM
*Originally Posted by Ali-bear [+]
Maybe they will eventually put out a 1000cc big brother of the CBR650F.


 :435: looking at the picture of the "maybe" new "BIG 1"  it nearly is ? :028:
If theres a gap i can get through it !!!

Some people pay for an IAM... I am mad.....

#19

Offline SaturnV

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Re: Would you consider buying a BMW R1200RS?
Reply #19 on: 14 June, 2017, 08:24:56 PM
*Originally Posted by Ali-bear [+]
Maybe they will eventually put out a 1000cc big brother of the CBR650F.

Thought they already had; it's called the Fireblade  :mfrlol:

 


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