Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Apparently a common issue on CBF1000 A8. Has anyone ever had to deal with this?  (Read 403 times)

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Offline colvic

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This image is of the ‘bracing bar’ behind the radiator on my 2008 CBF. I guess it provides some level of structural integrity to the bike as well as providing the bottom radiator mounting pegs an horn mount.

The bike has been off the road for nearly 2 years as the last MOT stated an advisory on this issue which would cause a fail the next time. I’m pretty sure I rode it in this condition for nearly a year without noticing any adverse handling etc.

I was told this was quite common on this model and note that on later models this bar seems to be bolted on now which may be to allow easy replacement as part of a design enhancement to the frame.

Has anyone ever had to deal with this on this model and would you have any advice?

My thoughts are to have it cut out, a new one refashioned and welded in or drill through and bolt a bar in much like the new model has.

I guess it may even be possible to buy the part from the new model and see if it can be used on the older model I have with a bit of modification.

This is as a result of riding through the winter for 10 years. I wont be doing that any more going forward.

Thanks for any advice
Chris

Offline Art

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Its one area of several to expect some corrosion. Would it not be possible to have a brace bolted or welded across, plenty of meat on the brackets either side to attach it to although it is an area tight on space. Keep an eye on the spacing and orientation of the radiator mounting points.

I don't think motorcycles have ever been too good when it comes to resisting corrosion, especially for us all year riders here in the UK where the roads get a goodly salty gritting each winter and don't be thinking ACF50 is the solution it isn't, it just gets washed off by the road fling. Other common areas to expect corrosion are the radiator fan motor bracket,  front cowl stays, swing arm, side stand, centre stand, centre stand bracket, rear brake pivot etc. A close up and personal inspection of the areas behind the front wheel and in front of the rear wheel will reveal the extent of what other corrosion you need to catch up with.

The beauty of doing all your own home mechanics is that you can check for corrosion and keep on top of it over time. I keep a wire brush, emery paper, black Hammerite gloss and a paint brush handy at servicing times. With the CBF well into its teens it seems to need touching up somewhere or other at every service now. Just done the swing arm and back end in Lockdown, next up will be the front cowl stays when they're off at the next 16,000 service.

After the horse has bolted, there's no need to stop riding through the winter my weapons of choice for prevention are a 5L low pressure spray to hose off road fling and a water dispersant maintenance spray to disperse any collected water.




« Last Edit: 08 June, 2020, 12:02:08 PM by Art »

Offline colvic

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Thanks for chipping in Art.

Indeed, every area you mentioned has some level of corrosion. The swing arm especially. The plan at some point is to take that off and have it blasted and recoated or replaced if it turns out to be really bad. The radiator fan mount has pretty much disintegrated as you said.

Excuse my ignorance, are the front cowl stays the frame where the front side fairings attach?

My forks could do with repainting too.

Yes I agree. A retrofitted bolt through option using a solid bar with carefully tacked on bottom radiator mounts could well be the way to go. Especially as it seems the newer CBF1000’s have this method.

I don’t think this bar is taking any heavy duty loading or structural work other than providing a bit of triangular rigidity to the front engine mount ‘wishbone’ although I would defer to anyone with more knowleddge of bike frames than myself. It’s a relatively thin gauge hollow tube it seems. 

Offline Careca

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Its a bit late now to help the OP but I use Dynax - uc .
I think its absolutely excellent. Take your time applying so you only get it where you want it .


https://www.bilthamber.com/corrosion-protection-and-rust-treatments/dynax-uc

Hope it helps
Nat

Offline colvic

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Thanks Nat

Always good to have a bunch of options to look at.

C

Offline spinspin

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I looked at this and have spent the last hour trying to clean mine! I can see how it ends up rotting away if you don't look after it. May invest in a brush.

What other areas are particularly bad? Would be great to know where people generally miss on a regular wash!

Offline Art

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Front fork lowers, did I forget to mention the front fork lowers.

I don't think its got anything to do with bits that get missed when cleaning, I never clean my bike other than maintenance spray and a wipe down with an oily rag. I do all my own maintenance and when servicing look for corrosion and tend to it as and when it rears its ugly head. All four season motorcycles lose out to corrosion.

Offline spinspin

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Nice one, already done those so all good. Yes I'm similar, I had an FZS600 previously and managed to keep that going for 12 years till it had just over 100k on the clock and spent a few years as a motorcycle instructor where it earned the majority of its miles. Not in the same position now and not putting on the same miles but Haynes manual in hand I'm confident in doing my own maintenance & a few mods on the way.

I've seen from a lot of photos peoples downpipes look quite nasty but don't seem to rot away (had this happen on the fazer) I guess they are stainless steel as standard so don't need as much care?

 


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