Author Topic: Too Close for Comfort  (Read 2665 times)

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Offline golfsharpy12

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Too Close for Comfort
on: 17 November, 2014, 01:46:48 PM
On Sat after a long run out was returning through my local village just as the daylight was going.  On the other side of the road was a long line of cars with the opposite lane partially blocked all in a street lit 30mph zone.  No cars coming so I headed off up my side of the road - when I was about 1/3 of the way up a Red Peugot 106 came down the middle of the road - travelling at a fair pace - at this point I was along side the wall on my side of the road so moved over as far as I could with about 5 inches between me and my widest exterimity - the panniers.  Anyway said Peugot kept coming at a fair lick and I though he's never going to get past so brought the bike almost to a stop adjacent to the wall - - next thing an almighty thump from the back of the bike - where he clouted the pannier with his wing mirror - no damage, but a streak of red paint off his mirror on the top side of the pannier.  Scary thing is it was an old bloke driving who did not even appear to notice I was there despite me flashing and sounding the horn.   By the time I had my breath back he had dissapeared rouind the corner and off.  Thankfully no damage done other than he scared the cr.. out of me.  The driver seemed blissifully unaware throughhout.  :087: Reported to the Police but as did not have his reg no they cannot do much - but lord Oh - how can someone be that unaware.  Oh and I checked, and my headlights were working.     

Steve

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Offline Montblanc

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #1 on: 17 November, 2014, 03:57:18 PM
Glad you made out with only a scratch to your pannier. Doesn't sound like there is much you could have done differently to avoid the bloke.
Montblanc

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Offline richardcbf

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #2 on: 17 November, 2014, 04:01:38 PM
*Originally Posted by golfsharpy12 [+]
...a Red Peugot 106 came down the middle of the road....he clouted the pannier with his wing mirror - no damage, but a streak of red paint off his mirror on the top side of the pannier.....
Scary stuff - glad you weren't knocked off.
I guess that was your Z1000sx and if so are the mounted pannier tops any higher from the ground than with a CBF1000?
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Offline hondacbf

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #3 on: 17 November, 2014, 04:14:37 PM
Well... what does a motorcyclist have to do to get him or her self SEEN.
The get out clause " I DID NOT SEE HIM/HER " is unacceptable.
You have been very lucky to come away unscathed.
I wonder if you were driving a jcb if he would have seen you!!!.

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Online Rev Ken

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #4 on: 17 November, 2014, 05:28:32 PM
Sounds as if his width perception has gone to pot - so glad you are OK. As somebody who can claim to be in his age category, personally I make sure other skilled riders check out my riding, get my eyes checked regularly, and check my reaction time when we (IAM) have a stall at shows. As soon as I start scaring myself, or others see my riding is getting erratic, I'll stop riding, but continue driving. The problem we oldies have is that we THINK we are OK, but even if we know we are struggling with traffic etc, we don't want to give up our independence so are reluctant to get our driving checked. Here in Cumbria we have several free schemes for oldies to be checked out, but I think it is only those who think they are still OK, and have something to prove, usually to their concerned family, who come forward!

To-day was a typical example of someone driving who really ought to have at least a test if not give up all together. A Nissan Micra in the right hand lane (marked right only) at a roundabout suddenly cut across my bows to go straight on, (I was in my 'menoporsche') she then proceeded at a breakneck speed, once reaching 25mph, but stopping whenever there was approaching traffic, I guess she was used to driving a bus. To say her driving was erratic is an understatement, so who is going to stop her - unless she has an accident?

We test drivers for alcohol when they've been involved in an accident, so why not eyesight and reaction times? Even insist on a  driving check (not a formal driving test as few of us would want to revert to novice driving) and if not up to scratch have a variety of options, from a 'brush up' to banning on medical grounds.
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Offline Thumper86

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #5 on: 17 November, 2014, 08:05:33 PM
This happens all to often; fortunately you came out unscathed with only a minor brush up with his mirror to you pannier.  It always fails to amaze me how stupid, ignorant or unaware drivers are on the road.  And with texting being a growing habit for drivers, this is another risk we must be watchful of.

To be a motorcyclist we must exercise added caution. Your presence of mind to stop along the side was your saving grace.

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Offline golfsharpy12

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #6 on: 17 November, 2014, 08:41:08 PM
 :190:
*Originally Posted by richardcbf [+]
Scary stuff - glad you weren't knocked off.
I guess that was your Z1000sx and if so are the mounted pannier tops any higher from the ground than with a CBF1000?

Never measured but I think they are possibly a few inches higher - looking at it again,  I was very lucky he did not catch the bars and my hand with the mirror - that would have hurt and possibly pitched me off.   At least the paint has t-cutted off so only a very faint mark left.

Steve
Last Edit: 18 November, 2014, 10:10:38 AM by golfsharpy12

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Offline Brickit

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #7 on: 17 November, 2014, 09:57:11 PM
I suppose I can claim to be getting on in years, but I do hope to keep my faculties for a bit longer yet, or at least until I can take my IAM bike test. :oldie:
As I've got older, I must say that I find driving at night and in poor light is more difficult and does require more concentration than in the past. That may have been a factor with your friend.
My wife is a PCSO (Community policewoman) and she has had to do a number of follow up visits after oldies have had scrapes, or if neighbours or family have been concerned. Rather than being heavy handed, her approach is to appeal to their good nature and common sense and it is invariably successful. As they get older they tend to use the car less and less and that lack of practice, combined with failing faculties, can be a dangerous combination. Somehow, the odd scrape, which they may not  have even noticed, doesn't force retirement, but a quiet word from a friend or police officer can do the trick. Totting up the cost per mile of them keeping a car, against the cost of using a taxi or public transport, very often tips the balance.
 We probably all know an oldie or two who is still driving and maybe should consider giving up. It really is our responsibility to check them out, before someone on a bike meets then coming the other way up a narrow road on a wet night.

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Offline NeiljohnUK

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Re: Too Close for Comfort
Reply #8 on: 18 November, 2014, 03:35:47 PM
*Originally Posted by Brickit [+]
I suppose I can claim to be getting on in years, but I do hope to keep my faculties for a bit longer yet, or at least until I can take my IAM bike test. :oldie:
As I've got older, I must say that I find driving at night and in poor light is more difficult and does require more concentration than in the past. That may have been a factor with your friend.
My wife is a PCSO (Community policewoman) and she has had to do a number of follow up visits after oldies have had scrapes, or if neighbours or family have been concerned. Rather than being heavy handed, her approach is to appeal to their good nature and common sense and it is invariably successful. As they get older they tend to use the car less and less and that lack of practice, combined with failing faculties, can be a dangerous combination. Somehow, the odd scrape, which they may not  have even noticed, doesn't force retirement, but a quiet word from a friend or police officer can do the trick. Totting up the cost per mile of them keeping a car, against the cost of using a taxi or public transport, very often tips the balance.
 We probably all know an oldie or two who is still driving and maybe should consider giving up. It really is our responsibility to check them out, before someone on a bike meets then coming the other way up a narrow road on a wet night.

Poor light and dirty/out of adjustment or just plain illegal HID lights, and the cyclists with strobing 20W cree OFF ROAD lights are what cause me the most issues at night, and I gather it's not just us 'experienced' riders and drivers that have issues with them.

I had a near miss in the car (Land-Rover 110, not exactly small) a couple of years ago when an old boy decided the lane I was in was empty on the M3 near Winchester, the following 10 miles off the Motorway were interesting, 30 limits and derestricted all done at 40 MPH by him (I slowed for the 30's he continued at the same pace), 3 more near misses witnessed, one involving a cyclist, and I reported him to the Police who wrote to me afterwards and said when they caught up with him his daughter told them she thought he was a danger, but wouldn't/couldn't do anything about it. When they did the number plate test he failed it completely, and they persuaded him to give up his licence...

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Formerly an EMT (1), now a Superintendent, not that makes any difference, still just as crazy...
I ride for pleasure, commute mostly by PTW, do most of my own spannering.
Started to do my IAM, having done the RoSPA version years ago, seems I'm not fast enough, unlike the Chief Observer I'm not prepared to do 50+ in a 40 limit, so I've given it up as a bad job, 'too slow to pass, too old to care'!

 


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