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Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #10 on: 20 April, 2011, 12:31:41 PM »
*Originally Posted by bross [+]
... some speculate this could be causing some of the their stator failures, which I guess may make sense. If the stator can't dump excess current to ground then it could cause it to over heat. ...

The stator is "floating" and must definitely not have any connection to ground. So I would not consider this a source for stator failures. Apart from that keeping the grounding point in perfect condition is always important.

 :002: ... Fred

Offline bross

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #11 on: 20 April, 2011, 05:01:34 PM »
Good to know, thanks Fred. Mine's clean now.  :031:

Offline TerryR

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #12 on: 21 April, 2011, 07:14:46 AM »
*Originally Posted by FireBladerDk [+]
The stator is "floating" and must definitely not have any connection to ground. So I would not consider this a source for stator failures.

A bad ground could confuse the regulator which, in turn, could damage the alternator. I don't think it's likely but I wouldn't say it's impossible.

T.

Offline java

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #13 on: 22 April, 2011, 01:57:55 AM »
Great posting and job well done Bross! I definitive will bookmark your posting for future reference.

 :190:
« Last Edit: 22 April, 2011, 02:01:18 AM by java »
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Offline bross

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #14 on: 22 April, 2011, 04:13:42 PM »
Updated my message Fred to remove the confusing/wrong statements and left it at simply, clean the connection. That will keep confusion to a minimum in the future.

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #15 on: 25 April, 2011, 12:26:36 PM »
Hi All,

I have now integrated the excellent "Valve Clearance Adjustment DIY" description by bross with our on-line manual on www.fireblader.dk .

First of all thanks to bross for his contibution.  :047: I know only too well  how much work and time is takes to document the work with so many pictures and text.

Secondly I would - as always - appreciate input from reviewers so we can be sure nothing is left in the dark in the Valve Clearance Adjustment DIY Article.

I will open the review with a couple of questions you bross:

1) You did not describe anything about the cam chain guide at the top (ref. page 9-9 in the Honda Shop Manual). I suppose it was just as described in the shop manual and I just need to add a sentence about this. Did you take any pictures showing this item?

2) Do I need to add anything more to the tools list?

 :031: ... Fred

 
« Last Edit: 25 April, 2011, 10:33:14 PM by FireBladerDk »

Offline eskandalis

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #16 on: 25 April, 2011, 10:00:31 PM »
You just tuned the hole bike not just the valves.
great job !!!
judolight.blogspot.com

Offline Bifferman

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #17 on: 26 April, 2011, 09:00:06 AM »
*Originally Posted by bross [+]
Forgot to mention this ground connection. Quite a few people on the VFR forum have been finding bad/poor/corroded ground connections.



Anyway, before you throw your tank back on, check this connection. I removed it, cleaned the frame with a wire brush and applied dialectric grease to all the ground connections and bolt before re-tightening.

I am  :087:  Why use a dialetric grease on an ground point.  Dialectric grease is a silicon based NON conductive grease and if you have removed the wires and plastered this all over your ground point before reinstating the wires that need grounding then you will reduce the grounding effect rather than enhance it.

The first time I had the tank up I noticed a bit of electric corrosion around the  terminals.  Removed, cleaned, replaced and then applied Finnigans Waxoyl.  Keep the connections free from anything that might insulate the connection, then add the anti corrosion treatment whether ordinary grease, Waxoyl or even Dialectric but do NOT smother the terminals with Dialectric grease as you reassemble - leave CLEAN and protect after all bolted back together.

Andy

 :149:

Offline bross

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #18 on: 26 April, 2011, 10:27:53 AM »
Why do a lot of wiring harnesses come from the factory filled with this grease? And it's been regularly recommended on the Triumph forums that the first thing you do to a modern Triumph twin (Bonneville, Scrambler) is to remove *every* connector, including the spark plug caps and apply dialectric grease liberally, basically fill each connector with grease, then re-connect. My own Scrambler died twice while riding in the rain, until I did the above. Then I never had another problem riding in the rain???

Any article I have ever read about using dialectric grease recommends applying to both sides of a connection before reconnecting???
http://www.ehow.com/how_5621534_apply-dielectric-grease.html

"Open the tube of dielectric grease and apply a small amount to the surfaces of the connectors where they meet. The grease will help stop future corrosion while allowing the electricity to make contact through it.

Reassemble the connector or plug in the bulb carefully. If any grease squeezes out during reassembly, wipe it off with a rag or towel."


and another that agrees with you in saying it's non-conductive, but also recommends applying to contact surfaces.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dielectric-grease.htm

"While the indicated use of dielectric grease calls for it to be used only on the non-metal parts of a connection, it has been shown to be effective at preventing corrosion when applied directly to the metal connectors as well. Care should be taken when using it in this way, because this application can, in some instances, cause the connection to stop working. A common reason for such a failure is that the grease has not been pushed entirely out of the way between the two points of contact."

I'm a believer after experiencing the intermittent stalling problems on my Scrambler and having them completely go away after using the dialectric grease on all the connectors.
« Last Edit: 26 April, 2011, 10:33:16 AM by bross »

Offline Danish

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Re: Valve adjustment
« Reply #19 on: 26 April, 2011, 04:02:07 PM »
I haven┤t used this grease, but it is probably working by sealing out moisture from the connection so there can be no corrosion.

The groundconnection can be tested to see if there is a voltdrop indicating resistance. The volts on the connectors should be the same as the volts on the frame after the groundpoint.

Cheers
Peter
A million flies can┤t be wrong